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Tag Archives: familial hypercholesterolaemia

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16

Lipids and CVD: improving practice and clinical outcome

Abstract

This supplement is a report from the inaugural meeting of the Cardiometabolic Forum, jointly organised by the British Journal of Cardiology and HEART UK – The Cholesterol Charity. The meeting was held at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, London, on 24th November 2011. Meeting chairs were Dr Dermot Neely (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne) for HEART UK, and Dr Henry Purcell (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and Editor) for BJC. We hope this supplement will provide readers with an independent overview on recent developments in our knowledge of cholesterol metabolism and its implications for clinical practice. Speakers Dermot Neely

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How can we improve clinical diagnosis of dyslipidaemia?

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s02

How can we improve clinical diagnosis of dyslipidaemia?

Dermot Neely

Abstract

Abnormalities in plasma lipoprotein concentrations are found in seven of out every 10 patients with premature coronary disease, with a familial disorder in more than half of these cases, highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis and scope for early treatment of affected families.1 Clinical assessment, incorporating review of phenotypic features, personal and family history, physical signs and laboratory tests, is fundamental to diagnosis. Table 1. Key tests to exclude secondary causes of dyslipidaemia In the first instance, it is important to exclude secondary causes of dyslipidaemia. Diabetes mellitus, untreated hypothyroidism, neph

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In brief

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:203-206

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

UK cholesterol awareness low Millions of people in the UK hold incorrect beliefs about the risks of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to HEART UK research. The research, which tested 1,177 people on their knowledge and concerns about high cholesterol, revealed that more than 40% of respondents wrongly thought that raised cholesterol resulted from drinking too much, while almost 60% did not know that the condition can be inherited. Almost half the population have never had a cholesterol check and only 2% of those surveyed named high cholesterol as their biggest health concern. The top health worry for people was cancer, even though CVD i

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Familial hypercholesterolaemia –  a developing English scandal

April 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:54−5

Familial hypercholesterolaemia – a developing English scandal

Jonathan Morrell

Abstract

Findings Nearly 70% of eligible PCTs responded to this survey, with many PCTs admitting to a lack of formal planning for FH, and incomplete knowledge about relevant FH services. Looking at the results as a whole, I think it is safe to say that the failure to implement the guidelines at PCT level suggests that national guidance is not always given local priority. More than 40% of the respondents admitted to a shortage of specialist care for people with FH, including adults, children and pregnant women. A number of PCTs indicated that they face barriers to treating FH patients and these concerns need to be addressed immediately if the guidelin

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July 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:205–9

Efficacy of ezetimibe and future role in the management of refractory hyperlipidaemia in high-risk patients

Rizwan Sarwar, Clare Neuwirth, Shahenaz Walji, Yvonne Tan, Mary Seed, Gilbert R Thompson, Rossi P Naoumova

Abstract

Introduction About 10 million deaths in the world are caused each year by coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke.1 Comparative statistics in Britain2 are on a smaller scale but in relative terms, similar. Total mortality in the UK is approximately 600,000 annually, 36% of which is due to cardiovascular disease. Half of the latter is from CHD, a quarter from stroke and it is the main cause of premature mortality in both men and women. Recently it was estimated that the major modifiable risk factor, raised serum cholesterol, accounted for 45% of all myocardial infarcts in Western Europe.3 The introduction of statins 20 years ago has revolution

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:79–81

Familial hypercholesterolaemia: recognising the unrecognised

Jonathan Morrell

Abstract

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:83-85

Low-density lipoprotein-apheresis: an update

Stefanos Archontakis, Alison Pottle, Mahmoud Barbir

Abstract

Indications, techniques and effects Low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis is a selective lipid-lowering extracorporeal treatment where LDL and other atherogenic apoB-lipoproteins are removed from circulation while high-density lipoprotein (HDL) remains virtually unchanged. In the last years, individual authors as well as various scientific organisations have proposed different indications for using LDL-apheresis. The most widely used guidelines are those of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA,1 of the Federal Committee of Physicians and Health Insurance Funds in Germany2 and recently, those of the International Panel on the M

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January 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:7-11

UK approves testing embryos for FH

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

FH is caused by a single gene defect on chromosome 19. Individuals with two copies of the defective gene have severely raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels from birth and are predisposed to early atherosclerosis. Many die in childhood, and most suffer at least one myocardial infarction by the end of their 20s. The milder, heterozygous form of FH is much more common and can be managed using a combination of diet and drugs. The couple for whom the licence has been awarded discovered that they were both heterozygous for FH only after having their first child who is homozygous for FH. The pre-implantation diagnosis will involve

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:201-202

Back to the future: familial hypercholesterolaemia revisited

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

No content available

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May 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:191-4

Familial hypercholesterolaemia in children

D Paul Nicholls

Abstract

No content available

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