This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: ischaemic heart disease

July 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:105–7 doi:http://doi.org/10.5837/bjc.2017.017 Online First

The age of diagnostic coronary angiography is over

Andrew J M Lewis

Abstract

The problem Diagnostic coronary angiography died some time ago, so why has it still not yet been buried alongside the exploratory laparotomy? The problem is clear: despite over half a century of experience, almost two-thirds of those undergoing elective diagnostic angiograms do not have obstructive coronary artery disease.1 Even in contemporary National Health Service (NHS) cardiac catheter laboratories, non-flow limiting coronary disease or angiographically normal coronary arteries remain common findings. Coronary angiography is now, arguably, the last invasive procedure to be performed with primarily diagnostic intent on this scale. How do

| Full text
Can marriage mend a broken heart (and save the National Health Service)?

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:130–1 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.036

Can marriage mend a broken heart (and save the National Health Service)?

Nicholas D Gollop

Abstract

The role of marital status and social support is becoming increasingly recognised as an important factor promoting recovery and rehabilitation following ACS.2 Marital benefits There are several large and robust studies that show that marriage infers a survival benefit following an ACS.3–6 The mechanisms behind these survival benefits are not fully understood, but are thought to be associated with living a healthier lifestyle, improved social support, assistance with medication, and rehabilitation compliance. There are opposing claims that an ‘unhappy marriage’ may infer cardiovascular health complications.7 However, in most cases, peop

| Full text

October 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:146 Online First

Correspondence: from balloons to stents and back again?

Drs Usha Rao and Simon C Eccleshall

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a mainstay of treatment. The management of IHD has been revolutionised by major advancements in the field of coronary angioplasty, starting with the use of balloons for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in 1977 by Gruentzig.1 However, their use was limited by acute recoil (approximately 40%), vessel dissection and a high re-stenosis rate (50%). To treat the acute problems of recoil and dissection (with acute vessel closure) and reduce the rate of re-stenosis, coronary stents were introduced

| Full text

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:51

Correspondence: aggressive risk factor modification: 30 year follow-up of IHD and non-haemorrhagic stroke

John Revill

Abstract

Aggressive risk factor modification: 30 year follow-up of IHD and non-haemorrhagic stroke Dear Sirs, In a single doctor’s practice in a high-risk area of South Sheffield, aggressive measures were taken to prevent ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and non-haemorrhagic stroke (ST) since 1980. Four cardinal risk factors were detected: smoking, diabetes, hypertension and cholesterol. Smoking, diabetes and hypertension were treated critically using standard guidelines and applying the latest evidence available independent of cost from 1980 onwards. Mortality from IHD has been known for many years to be directly related to the level of serum choleste

| Full text

September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16: 231-235

Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in patients with established ischaemic heart disease

Rachel Abela, Ioannis Prionidis, Timothy Beresford, Gerald Clesham, Delphine Turner, Reto Gamma, Tom Browne

Abstract

Introduction The UK government’s recent commitment to aneurysm screening and the potential for funding this, will undoubtedly lead to increased interest in the organisation of new screening programmes by different trusts. In April 2007, the UK National Screening committee – AAA Screening Working Group published a draft for Standard Operating Procedures For An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Screening Programme.1 The recommendations for population selection offer a single scan for males in the year they reach 65 years of age and also for males over 65 on request. Females, males under 65, those receiving previous AAA surgery, patients with

| Full text

April 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:

Secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care:the evidence

Jonathan Mant

Abstract

No content available

| Full text

January 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:7–9

Britain: still the sick man of Europe?

Adrian JB Brady

Abstract

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now