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Tag Archives: mortality

July 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(3) doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.023

Heart failure specialist nurse care: more questions than answers!

Angela Graves, Nick Hartshorne-Evans

Abstract

There is no precise definition of what constitutes a HFSN, and the exact number of HFSNs and where they are located is not well understood. Therefore, one of the key recommendations of the inquiry was that Health Education England should work with the Royal College of Nursing and the Nursing and Midwifery Council to ascertain the number and location of HFSNs. Despite this recommendation, no particular body appeared to come forward to undertake this crucial piece of work. At the Pumping Marvellous Foundation’s Heart Failure Summit 2017,3 which was comprised of multi-stakeholders, the commitment was made by the charity, supported by an unres

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May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:63–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.019

Use of Frailsafe criteria to determine frailty syndrome in older persons admitted with decompensated HF

Janine Beezer, Titilope Omoloso, Helen O’Neil, John Baxter, Deborah Mayne, Samuel McClure, Janet Oliver, Zoe Wyrko, Andy Husband

Abstract

Introduction Frailty is a distinctive health state, related to the ageing process, in which multiple body systems gradually lose their in-built reserves, and is related to poorer outcomes.1 There have been numerous tools developed to identify frailty,2-4 often these tools are complex and not suitable for identifying patients at the time of admission to hospital, requiring a comprehensive geriatric assessment to validate them. The British Geriatrics Society developed the Frailsafe5,6 checklist, which was piloted across 12 UK hospitals in 2014 as part of the Frailsafe collaborative. The tool used three screening indicators to identify patients

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January 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:35 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.005 Online First

Association of subclinical hypothyroidism in heart failure: a study from South India

Pramod Kumar Kuchulakanti, VCS Srinivasarao Bandaru, Anurag Kuchulakanti, Tallapaneni Lakshumaiah, Mehul Rathod, Rajeev Khare, Parsa Sairam, Poondru Rohit Reddy, Athuluri Ravikanth, Avvaru Guruprakash, Regalla Prasada Reddy, Banda Balaraju

Abstract

Introduction Heart failure (HF) is a complex disease, characterised by the reduced capacity of the heart to pump blood, supply or fill with blood, and is a cause of hospitalisation.1 HF is rapidly growing in developed and developing countries, with an estimated prevalence of more than 37 million individuals.2 HF is associated with a high rate of hospitalisation and it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.1-3 Existing studies have shown that several comorbid factors and biomarkers are associated with HF and its prognosis.4 Recent studies have associated subclinical hypothyroidism with increased blood pressure, insulin resistan

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Risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes among patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation

December 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:158 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.036

Risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes among patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation

Debra E Irwin, Michelle Johnson, Simon Hogan, Mark Davies, Chris Arden

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia characterised by uncoordinated activation of the atria. AF is a progressive disease and represents the most common serious disorder of cardiac rhythm. The incidence and prevalence of the disease increase progressively with age and is more common among men.1–5 AF is associated with higher mortality and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity.6–13 Specifically, AF is a recognised risk factor for stroke, with the proportion of strokes attributable to AF increasing exponentially with age.1,2,7,14–17 Although clinicians are most concerned about stroke risk among AF patients, c

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September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:90

Correspondence: gender and outcome from acute myocardial infarction and secondary stroke

Professor Ivy Shiue; Dr Krasimira Hristova; Professor Jagdish Sharma

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Research on sex difference in mortality after myocardial infarction (MI) since the 1990s has been debated and increased. Several observational studies have shown that younger women, in particular, seemed to have higher mortality rates than men of similar age during the two-year or longer follow-up, although these studies were mainly from the USA.1-3 Recent American studies have also found that, even after full adjustment for potential risk factors, excess risk for in-hospital mortality for women was still noted, particularly among those <50 years old with acute ST-segment elevation MI, leading to 98% (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% c

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Is Alice still in Wonderland of the ‘smoker’s paradox’? A meta-analysis of mortality following ACS

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:117 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.028

Is Alice still in Wonderland of the ‘smoker’s paradox’? A meta-analysis of mortality following ACS

Hisato Takagi, Takuya Umemoto; for the ALICE (All-Literature Investigation of Cardiovascular Evidence) Group

Abstract

Introduction Following observations that smokers experience decreased mortality following acute myocardial infarction (acute MI [AMI]) in comparison with non-smokers,1 the term ‘smoker’s paradox’ was introduced into scientific discourse more than 25 years ago.2 The ‘smoker’s paradox’ following various reperfusion strategies, however, is argued not to be due to any benefit from smoking itself but simply due to smokers being likely to undergo such procedures at a much younger age, and, hence, having, on average, lower comorbidity. In a recent systematic review (with a search by September 2010)2 of 17 studies presenting adjusted tota

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In brief

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:136-7

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Caffeine intake may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes Coffee and caffeine intake may significantly reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes, according to a new meta-analysis published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and EMBASE. The fixed- or random-effect pooled measure was selected based on between-study heterogeneity. Dose–response relationship was assessed. Commenting on the implications of this study (doi: 10.1007/s00394-013-0603-x), London general practitioner Dr Sarah Jarvis said: “There is growing evidence to suggest that moderate coffee consumption, that’s four

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SHARPening up research in Scotland

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:57-8. Online First

SHARPening up research in Scotland

Abstract

Encouraging young researchers Death rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) are falling across the UK, but the rates remain high in Scotland with a slower rate of decline than the rest of the devolved nations.1 A recent Audit Scotland report has highlighted that although death rates of all types of heart disease have reduced by around 40% in the past 10 years, they remain the second highest cause of death after cancer.1 Between 1991 and 1996 the SHARP mobile screening unit successfully screened 19,400 Scots between the ages of 18 and 70 years, mainly at their place of work. Currently 14,694 people remain alive on this database, all of whom ar

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October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:217

Correspondence

Drs Ewan J McKay, Tina Tian, Nick Gerning, Chris Sawh, Pankaj Garg, John Purvis, Sinead Hughes and Mark Noble

Abstract

When the dentist said: “Be still your beating heart!” Dear Sirs, We all often encounter a patient history and apparent presenting complaint that we can not precisely and cleverly explain. Our patient, Mr BW, a fit and active 53-year-old man, attended a routine appointment as an outpatient. He had done this many times previously as he was experiencing difficuties with heart rate control and troubling symptoms secondary to atrial fibrillation (AF). Coincidentally, he had also had amalgam dental fillings drilled some 18 months previously. Since then, his cardiac problems had escalated. There appeared no clear causality between the fillings a

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November 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:299–302

Lifespan and cardiology

Kiran Patel, Yin May Yan, Kamlesh Patel, Parminder Judge, Janki Patel, Sandeep Johal, Sukhdip Johal, Paul Do, Francisco Leyva

Abstract

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