This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: NICE

June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:111–12

In brief

Abstract

Controversial salt paper published A new European study has caused controversy by suggesting that lowering salt intake may not be beneficial. The study, published recently in JAMA (May 4th 2011 issue), was conducted by a team from the University of Leuven, Belgium. They followed 3,681 participants who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline for a median of 7.9 years, and found an inverse relationship between cardiovascular deaths and 24-hour sodium excretion (which correlates to salt intake), although systolic blood pressure was higher with higher salt intake. But an editorial in the Lancet (May 12th 2011 issue) criticises the study,

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:7-8

The exercise ECG – here today, gone tomorrow?

Ronak Rajani, S Richard Underwood

Abstract

Although the guidelines for the assessment of acute chest pain are largely in keeping with modern practice, those for the assessment of stable chest pain of recent onset are controversial in denying a role for the exercise ECG.2 The guidance concerns only the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) causing angina (or “the diagnosis of angina” to use NICE’s incorrect terminology) and it does not consider management. It highlights the need for clinical assessment to determine the likelihood of CAD and places appropriate emphasis on the nature of the chest pain. This follows classical teaching in describing chest pain as typ

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

Foreword

Julian Halcox - Professor of Cardiology and Consultant Cardiologist

Abstract

To address the question of increasing engagement with CR programmes in target areas, in 2009, I chaired a Steering Committee convened by Abbott Healthcare Products Ltd. (formerly Solvay Healthcare) called ‘Setting the Standard for Cardiac Rehabilitation’ (START). The Steering Committee advised that the existing Cardiac Networks in each region would be the best forum for disseminating information about changes in CR funding and standards of care in this field. Abbott Healthcare Products Ltd. kindly agreed to organise a series of meetings in the UK, held during 2009 and early 2010, with the aim of raising awareness of the importance of CR a

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

Why is cardiac rehabilitation so important?

John Buckley

Abstract

WHO definition The World Health Organization (WHO) defined CR in 1993 in a timeless way that is inclusive and sensitive to the psychosocial, biomedical, professional expertise and service delivery mode and location elements required of a contemporary CR service. “The sum of activities required to influence favourably the underlying cause of the disease so that (people) may by their own efforts preserve, or resume when lost, as normal a place in the community… …it must be integrated within secondary prevention services of which it forms one facet”.3 BACR definition This article reflects on how this definition dovetails with the BACR St

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

Overview of UK cardiac rehabilitation services: a West Midlands perspective 

Dr E Jane Flint

Abstract

In fact, fewer than half of networks have ever benefited from Patient Choice Revascularisation Pathway monies, which were originally intended to support CR also.2 The START meeting in Birmingham in December 2009 was an opportunity to celebrate the innovative approach undertaken by the West Midlands’ Regional NSF Implementation Group for Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention, describing local CR pathway service standards against which West Midlands’ CR programmes could be audited to inform commissioning. The subsequent proportional allocation of ‘Patient Choice’ rehabilitation funding across Birmingham and the Black Country w

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s8-s10

Sharing best practices: a nurse-led cardiac prevention and rehabilitation service

Judith Edwards 

Abstract

The service at Charing Cross was used as the model for EUROACTION, a randomised, controlled trial of a preventive cardiology programme, conducted in eight European countries, including the UK. This nurse-led multidisciplinary programme significantly improved the management of lifestyle and medical risk factors for cardiovascular disease prevention in coronary patients and patients at high multifactorial risk for developing heart disease.1 The principles of the EUROACTION programme were used to found The MyAction community programme, commissioned in 2008 by NHS Westminster as a model for preventive cardiology care for its residents. The Imperi

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s11-s2

Exercise: tipping the balance towards sustained participation and lasting benefits

John Buckley

Abstract

What is beneficial exercise? A prime question needs to be considered before furthering this discussion: what is meant by beneficial exercise? The benefits of exercise impact on all aspects of health – physiological, psychological and social. A study by Fox (1999) found that short bouts of any activity, even low-intensity activity that may not bring about a significant physiological risk factor change, if it is performed regularly, will provide psychological benefits to self-esteem and self-efficacy, and reductions in anxiety and depression.2 Angina patients engaging in regular walking on a similar premise to that expressed by Fox show signi

| Full text

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:s13-s5

START: insights from the regions

Amarjit Sethi, John Townend, Adrian Brady, Julian Halcox

Abstract

North West London To try and identify local barriers and share good practice, we have been regularly reviewing our cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services in North West London. Through this process we hope to increase the average uptake in a step-wise fashion from 50–60% to the national target of 85%.1 Lack of appropriately funded services and low staffing levels are real problems across the sector, unfortunately. Nevertheless, some innovative approaches to CR are taking place. The uptake of CR services after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) for myocardial infarction has increased from 26% to 84% at Imperial College Healthcare

| Full text
In brief

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:15-6

In brief

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

NHA joins with BHS The Nurses Hypertension Association (NHA) has become part of the British Hypertension Society (BHS) after the BHS decided to invite nurses working in the field of hypertension and cardiovascular disease to be full members of the society. “This acknowledges the shift of care towards specialist nurses, particularly in primary care,” said Naomi Stetson, former head of the NHA. “In the current economic climate, it also made good business sense to have one united organisation.” All members of the NHA are now full BHS members and so the NHA has disbanded. “There is a strong Nurses Working Party within the society, which

| Full text

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:209

Latest NICE guidance on chronic heart failure

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

The new guideline, which covers the management of heart failure in adults in primary and secondary care, contains new and updated recommendations on diagnosis, pharmacological treatment, monitoring and rehabilitation. Key priorities for implementation in the guidance include: Referring patients with suspected heart failure and previous myocardial infarction (MI) to transthoracic Doppler 2D echocardiography and specialist assessment within two weeks. Measuring serum natriuretic peptides in patients with suspected heart failure without previous MI; referring those with very high levels of serum natriuretic peptides to urgent transthoracic Dopp

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now