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Tag Archives: oral anticoagulation

Insights in patients with atrial fibrillation and co-existing cardiovascular disease

July 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(suppl 2):S4–S9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.s08

Insights in patients with atrial fibrillation and co-existing cardiovascular disease

Khalid Khan, Honey Thomas

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is encountered with increasing frequency in clinical practice,1 and is associated strongly with adverse clinical outcomes, including stroke, cardiovascular events and death.2,3 Concomitant atherosclerotic disease may increase the risk of adverse outcomes in people with AF. For example, peripheral arterial disease was present in 11% of a large cohort of European patients with AF, and increased the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death, compared with patients with AF but no peripheral arterial disease.4 In addition, AF is associated with adverse outcomes in a range of other subgroups of patients, inclu

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Non-prescription of anticoagulants in patients discharged with stroke and atrial fibrillation

February 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:23–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.007

Non-prescription of anticoagulants in patients discharged with stroke and atrial fibrillation

Calum Creaney, Karissa Barkat, Christopher Durey, Susan Gallagher, Linda Campbell, Ashish MacAden, Paul Findlay, Gordon F Rushworth, Stephen J Leslie

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases an individual’s risk of stroke fivefold.1 Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with warfarin reduces the risk of stroke by 64%.2 Novel or direct oral anticoagulants are non-inferior to warfarin in preventing stroke in non-valvular AF and have a similar bleeding profile, but with a lower risk of fatal intracranial haemorrhage and several practical advantages.3-7 While several antiplatelet agents have been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke, they are considerably less effective than OAC, with a similar risk of major bleeding, and, therefore, are no longer recommended in national guidelines for

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August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:87 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.028

Initiating oral anticoagulation in hospitalised AF patients: it’s time to talk

Matthew Fay

Abstract

Dr Matthew Fay (Westcliffe Medical Practice, Shipley) Honarbakhsh et al. highlight an important point in their paper: when should this be done and who should take responsibility. Their review of patients who have been admitted acutely with AF or atrial flutter, looking at the outcome of anticoagulation if risk factors are present, seems to provide lamentable data, with only 57% being referred for oral anticoagulation. Of course, there may be a question as to whether, with patient-led decision-making, the acute hospital ward is the right environment for a considered and final decision as regards this important question. We need to consider the

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