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Tag Archives: percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

December 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27:126–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.037

Timely discharge of low-risk STEMI patients admitted for primary PCI in an Essex cardiothoracic centre

Izza Arif, Rajender Singh

Abstract

Introduction According to the British Heart Foundation (BHF), in the UK there are more than 100,000 hospital admissions each year due to ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), equating to 280 admissions each day, or one every five minutes.1 The Essex cardiothoracic centre (CTC) is a tertiary, state-of-the-art centre that is equipped to deal with these high-risk cases. There are five district hospitals covered by the Essex CTC to provide a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) service. The patient turnover is high and there are emergency and elective procedures undertaken every day. The discharge of patients needs to be timely

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October 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27:112–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.033

Should we still have the COURAGE to perform elective PCI in stable myocardial ISCHEMIA?

Telal Mudawi, Darar Al-Khdair, Muath Al-Anbaei, Asmaa Ali, Ahmed Amin, Dalia Besada, Waleed Alenezi

Abstract

The evidence COURAGE This study compared PCI plus optimal medical therapy with optimal medical therapy alone. There were 2,287 patients enrolled: 1,149 patients were equally randomised to receive PCI or medical therapy, testing all-cause mortality and myocardial infarction (MI) over a median of 4.6 years. The cumulative primary-event rates were not significantly different between the two groups (p=0.62). The same was the case for the composite of death, MI, and stroke (p=0.62); acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalisation (p=0.56), or MI (p=0.33). The trial concluded that elective PCI confers no prognostic benefit over medical therapy alone.

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April 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:79-80 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.012 Online First

Dedicated side-branch stent: what could go wrong?

Usha Rao, Simon C Eccleshall

Abstract

Case report Figure 1. A. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) showing a well-apposed stent in the first diagonal (D1) B. IVUS showing cup of Sideguard® slightly protruding into left anterior descending (LAD) (arrow) C. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showing a well-endothelialised stent in the D1 D. OCT showing a migrated and well-endothelialised stent in the LAD A 43-year-old male with a past medical history of severe asthma and transient ischaemic attack presented with exertional angina and a normal electrocardiogram (ECG). Coronary angiography demonstrated minor plaque disease in the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD) and ostial

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November 2005 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2005;12:AIC 74–AIC 79

The coronary pressure wire for decision- making in the real world

Williams Omorogiuwa, Michael Fisher

Abstract

No content available

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March 2005 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2005;12:AIC 27–AIC 30

Delivering a modern PCI service: can we change with the times?

Michael S Norell, Saib S Khogali, James M Cotton, Michael R Cusack

Abstract

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March 2004 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2004;11:AIC 7

A good thing after all? Raised cardiac enzymes after PCI

Nick Curzen

Abstract

No content available

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