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Tag Archives: prevention

How do we get adults and older adults to do more physical activity and is it worth it?

February 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:8–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.010

How do we get adults and older adults to do more physical activity and is it worth it?

Tess Harris, Umar Chaudhry, Charlotte Wahlich

Abstract

Currently, UK, US and World Health Organization (WHO) aerobic guidelines all advocate at least 150 minutes weekly of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in at least 10-minute bouts for adults and older adults,1,5,6 though the bout requirement is currently under debate,6 and even small amounts of physical activity provide protective health benefits. Walking is by far the most common physical activity, a brisk pace (approximately 3 mph, 5 km/hr) counts as MVPA, and walking is considered a ‘near-perfect’ exercise, with ability to gradually increase frequency and intensity with low risk of harm, while encouraging environmental sust

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Cardiovascular screening of young athletes with electrocardiography in the UK: at what cost?

January 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.002 Online First

Cardiovascular screening of young athletes with electrocardiography in the UK: at what cost?

Harshil Dhutia, Sanjay Sharma

Abstract

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JBS3 recommends lifetime CVD risk estimation

April 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:52–3 Online First

JBS3 recommends lifetime CVD risk estimation

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

This emphasis on short-term risk means the long-term consequences of modifiable risk factors may be overlooked. Age and male gender are currently the biggest drivers of risk, said Professor John Deanfield (Chair of JBS3 and British Heart Foundation Chair of Cardiology at UCL, London) at a launch event for the JBS3 recommendations. Treatment has favoured elderly men, with risk calculators disenfranchising the young, especially women, he added. The report, which the British Cardiovascular Society calls “an evolution in CVD prevention,” supports intensive management of people at high lifetime risk for CVD. Its message that early inte

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NICE guidance updates on statins and secondary prevention

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:9

NICE guidance updates on statins and secondary prevention

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19

Introduction: Cardiovascular health and disease prevention in clinical practice

Kornelia Kotseva, Mary Seed, David Wood

Abstract

Promoting cardiovascular health is central to the national strategy to reduce premature mortality in our population. In this supplement, we offer a new approach to cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention through the MyAction preventive cardiology programme, developed by Imperial College London. This nurse-led, multi-disciplinary, family-centred service embraces all patients with atherosclerotic disease – coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease – together with those identified through Health Checks to be at high risk of developing CVD in one community-based programme. In this supplement, we describe the studies that

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s03

MyAction and the new cardiovascular outcomes strategy

David A Wood Full author details can be found here.

Abstract

Introduction Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a single family of diseases with common antecedents requiring a holistic approach to prevention. This is the central theme of the new cardiovascular outcomes strategy for NHS England.1 Atherosclerosis is ubiquitous in the population, manifesting itself in different ways – acute coronary syndromes, transient cerebral ischaemia or claudication – but linked by a common pathology and underlying causes in terms of lifestyle and related risk factors. Many with one expression of this disease commonly suffer from another, and yet each is managed in silos of care through cardiology, stroke and vascul

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What is cardiac rehabilitation achieving for patients with CHD? The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT results

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s04

What is cardiac rehabilitation achieving for patients with CHD? The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT results

Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, David A Wood, on behalf of ASPIRE-2-PREVENT Study Group

Abstract

The main objective of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation in clinical practice is to reduce the risk of future vascular events, to improve quality of life and increase life expectancy. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is recommended by the British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (BACPR).1 This second edition of the Standards and Core Components (SCC) for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation from the BACPR, define CR through seven standards and seven core components for assuring a quality service of care using a multi-disciplinary biological and psychosocial approach.2 However, the implementatio

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s05

Dyslipidaemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease: DYSIS results in the UK

Vian Amber, Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Susan Connolly, Timothy J Bowker, David A Wood, on behalf of the DYSIS Study Group UK 

Abstract

Background Statins are first choice for treatment of dyslipidaemia in both secondary and primary cardiovascular disease prevention. For every 1.0 mmol/L reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‑C), the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality decreases by 19% and overall mortality decreases by 12%.1 Despite statin treatment, a substantial number of cardiovascular events still occur, and one reason may be persistent lipid abnormalities including total cholesterol and LDL-C not at target, or low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or elevated triglycerides. Results from the DYSlipidaemia International Stu

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s06

The principles of MyAction

Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Kornelia Kotseva, David A Wood, on behalf of the MyAction Central team

Abstract

The programme is implemented according to national evidence-based guidelines and local policies. The programme integrates primary and secondary prevention in one programme and recruits all those who will benefit the most, i.e. patients with vascular disease, those at high risk of developing disease, and the close family members of the above, and takes into account the groups in which the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors is the highest. The programme is family centred and so recruits the spouse and/or others close to the patient in order to maximise the potential for adoption of positive healthy behaviours. Wherever possib

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Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: NHS Westminster, London

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s07

Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: NHS Westminster, London

Susan Connolly, Adrian Brown, Sarah-Jane Clements, Christine Yates, Kornelia Kotseva, on behalf of Westminster MyAction teams

Abstract

MyAction Westminster: background In response to the Department of Health (DoH) policy document Putting Prevention First,1 NHS Westminster launched its Health Checks programme in primary care in 2009. The MyAction Westminster programme was concomitantly commissioned by NHS Westminster so that those individuals identified to be at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk through the Health Checks could access, with their families, an effective vascular prevention programme that would help them achieve measurably healthier lives. Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust were successful in becoming the providers of the programme with an annual budget

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