This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: revascularisation

April 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:66-7 doi:http://doi.org/10.5837/bjc.2017.009 Online First

Does CTCA improve the diagnostic yield from conventional coronary angiography? A DGH experience

Colin Reid, Mark Tanner, Hatef Mansoubi, Conrad Murphy

Abstract

Introduction Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is an established and validated alternative to invasive coronary angiography (ICA).1 The extent to which CTCA can replace ICA is controversial.2 The low diagnostic yield from ICA suggest there is ample scope to select patients more efficiently for investigation.3 In 2010, in the UK, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)4 published new guidelines for the investigation of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), which incorporated CTCA as a first-line investigation.5 In keeping with these guidelines, we ceased to use exercise testing as a primary t

| Full text
Is angiography overused for the investigation of suspected coronary disease? A single-centre study

April 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:77 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.012 Online First

Is angiography overused for the investigation of suspected coronary disease? A single-centre study

Colin J Reid, Mark Tanner, Conrad Murphy

Abstract

Introduction For many years coronary angiography (CA) has been used as the gold standard in the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and even a normal result is considered a worthwhile outcome.1 However, concern has been raised about the use and overuse of what is an invasive and expensive procedure.2-4 We examined our cardiac catheter database to assess our diagnostic yield in terms of detecting CAD, and also in terms of subsequent referral for coronary revascularisation, whether this be by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG), in a population of patients being assessed for possible CAD.

| Full text

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:13

BJC Learning angina programme

Abstract

Coronary heart disease is responsible for one sixth of UK deaths. Improvements in making an earlier diagnosis and more effective management have aided a reduction in mortality over the last two decades. Such improvements would not have been possible without well thought-out and carefully constructed guidance and teaching programmes. With the spread of internet technology, online medical education has seen an exponential growth in popularity. The British Journal of Cardiology (BJC) has recently launched its e-learning site BJC Learning and its first e-learning programme on angina (www.bjcardio.co.uk/learning). The angina e-learning programme

| Full text
Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s radial man!

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:214-215

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s radial man!

Michael Norell

Abstract

Yes, it’s true. After more than 20 years of accessing the arterial circulation almost consistently from the femoral approach, I have given in to the undeniable logic of the trans-radial enthusiasts. Was I among the last of a dwindling minority of dinosaurs, plodding on with traditional practice despite a changing – if not hostile – environment? Technology supporting the radial approach has undoubtedly advanced, and at the same time the interventional landscape has become less attractive to the use of a much larger vessel in which haemostatic control can never be guaranteed. I was wondering how this Damascene change in my practice came a

| Full text
The management of stable angina

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s02

The management of stable angina

Dr Chris Arden

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
The medical management of stable angina

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s03

The medical management of stable angina

Professor Kim Fox

Abstract

The new guideline from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)1 covers adults who have been diagnosed with stable angina due to atherosclerotic disease, following on from clinical guideline 95,2 which advises on diagnosis of chest pain of recent onset. A key priority for implementation in the latest guidance is to ensure that people with stable angina receive balanced information and have the opportunity to discuss the benefits, limitations and risks of their treatment. Initial management of stable angina should be to offer optimal drug treatment, addressing both the angina itself and secondary prevention of cardiovas

| Full text

November 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:303–4

Contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance in the decision making for revascularisation

Khaled Alfakih, Kate Pointon, Thomas Mathew

Abstract

Figure 1. A short-axis slice of the mid left ventricle illustrating contrast enhancement in the anterior segment (25% transmurality – viable), anterolateral segment (50–75% transmurality – non-viable), inferolateral segment (50% transmurality – potentially viable) Case 1 Mr K P is a 45-year-old man who presented to our hospital with symptoms of exertional breathlessness. His LV function was found to be severely impaired on echocardiography and it was initially thought that he had ‘dilated cardiomyopathy’. As he had a strong family history of coronary artery disease and was an ex-smoker, he underwent X-ray coronary angiography. He

| Full text

January 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:5-6

EDTA chelation therapy meets evidence-based medicine

Gervasio A Lamas, Steven J Hussein

Abstract

No content available

| Full text

November 2005 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2005;12:AIC 81–AIC 82

Percutaneous coronary interventions in West Yorkshire for the year 2002: an audit

Khaled Alfakih, Elizabeth Rennie, Stacey Hunter, James Mclenachan

Abstract

No content available

| Full text

May 2003 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2003;10:AIC 37–AIC 40

Why do we need the CARDia trial?

Akhil Kapur, Kevin J Beatt

Abstract

No content available

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now