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Tag Archives: rivaroxaban

November 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:133

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes cuts costs Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs and also travel costs for patients, especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study shows. The study, carried out in Northern Karelia by the University of Eastern Finland, found that by replacing half of the required follow-up visits for type 2 diabetes with self-measurements and electronic feedback, total costs of glycated haemoglobin monitoring were reduced by nearly 60%. The annual per-patient cost was down from 280 euros to 120 euros. Fewer follow-u

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October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:135–7 Online First

News from ESC 2018: COMMANDER HF – rivaroxaban in heart failure…

BJC Staff

Abstract

European Society of Cardiology congress 2018, held in Munich This was the key finding from COMMANDER HF (A Study to Assess the Effectiveness and Safety of Rivaroxaban in Reducing the Risk of Death, Myocardial Infarction, or Stroke in Participants with Heart Failure and Coronary Artery Disease Following an Episode of Decompensated Heart Failure) presented in a Hot Line Session and also published in The New England Journal of Medicine (DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1808848). Patients with worsening heart failure experience high rates of hospital readmission, and death. Previous studies have suggested that the enzyme thrombin may contribute to these poor o

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October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:135–7 Online First

News from ESC 2018: …and in VTE in the MARINER trial

BJC Staff

Abstract

European Society of Cardiology congress 2018, held in Munich The principal safety outcome of major bleeding also showed no significant difference between the rivaroxaban and placebo groups. Rivaroxaban, however, did reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE only, and symptomatic VTE and all-cause mortality, compared to placebo. On leaving hospital, the rate of symptomatic VTE more than doubles over the first 21 days and is associated with a five-fold increased risk of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) within 30 days post-discharge. The MARINER trial investigated whether continuing thromboprophylaxis with an oral anticoagulant after discharge could reduc

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Anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular AF undergoing PCI: clinical evidence from PIONEER AF-PCI

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S6–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s02

Anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular AF undergoing PCI: clinical evidence from PIONEER AF-PCI

Tarek Nafee, Gerald Chi, Fahad AlKhalfan, Serge Korjian, Yazan Daaboul, Seyedmahdi Pahlavani, Usama Talib, Aravind Reddy Kuchkuntla, Mahshid Mir, Mathieu Kerneis, C Michael Gibson

Abstract

Background, epidemiology and rationale for study The PIONEER AF-PCI (Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Study Exploring Two Treatment Strategies of Rivaroxaban and a Dose-Adjusted Oral Vitamin K Antagonist Treatment Strategy in Subjects with Atrial Fibrillation who Undergo Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) trial addressed an important medical question, which is potentially relevant for the 20–45% of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients who also have coronary artery disease and are likely to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Prior to the PIONEER AF-PCI trial, there was an unmet need for evidence-based recommendati

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November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:135

Rivaroxaban label update for extended VTE prevention

BJC Staff

Abstract

Current treatment recommendation for the prevention of recurrent VTE is anticoagulation therapy for three months or longer, depending on the balance between the risk of recurrent VTE and the risk of bleeding. However, the risk of patients with unprovoked VTE or with ongoing risk factors experiencing a second event is up to 10% in the first year if treatment is stopped. More than 25,000 people in the UK die from VTE every year. More news in this issue: NICE publishes updated familial hypercholesterolaemia guidance REDUCE shows non-inferiority of short versus long DAPT in acute coronary syndrome Primary Care Cardiovascular Society announces it

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October 2017

ESC 2017: COMPASS steers on anticoagulation in stable cardiovascular disease

Chris Allen

Abstract

Over a mean follow-up of 23 months, there was a marked decrease in the primary composite end point of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction in the combination therapy group by 24% (hazard ration [HR] 0.76; 95% CI 0.66-0.86; p<0.001) over aspirin monotherapy, and improved survival by 18%. The trial terminated prematurely by the data monitoring committee due to due to overwhelming efficacy. Rivaroxaban monotherapy showed no efficacy benefit. The anticipated trade-off was apparent with increased major bleeding in the combination therapy arm (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.40–2.05; p<0.001), although fatal and intracranial bleeds wer

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August 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(3) Online First

BCS 2017: spotlight on heart failure

BJC Staff, Dr Richard Crawley, Dr Brian Halliday, Dr Rosita Zakeri

Abstract

Landmark trials in heart failure – 30 years from CONSENSUS With 2017 marking the 30th year since the publication of CONSENSUS,1 which first reported a reduction in mortality with enalapril versus placebo in patients with advanced heart failure (HF), the BCS held a dedicated session to review the seminal clinical trials and advances in chronic heart failure management in this period. Dr Rosita Zakeri (Royal Brompton Hospital, London) reviewed this session for us and spoke to the BJC afterwards. Rosita Zakeri The era of vasodilator therapy for heart failure began in the 1990s. Professor Karl Swedberg (University of Gothenberg, Sweden) began

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Introduction

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 2):S1–S12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s02

Introduction

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Drug therapies include anticoagulants to reduce the risk of stroke and anti-arrhythmics to restore/maintain the normal heart rhythm or slow the heart rate in patients who remain in AF. Non-pharmacological management options include electrical cardioversion, which may be used to ‘shock’ the heart back to its normal rhythm. The high risk of stroke associated with electrical cardioversion can be reduced by oral anticoagulation. Although effective in reducing the risk of thromboembolism, the limitations of warfarin present considerable challenges for its use in clinical practice. The challenges of maintaining warfarin within an appropriate th

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Direct current cardioversion and thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 2):S1–S12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s02

Direct current cardioversion and thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms of AF lies at the heart of its treatment. AF occurs when structural and/or electrophysiological abnormalities alter atrial tissue to promote abnormal impulse formation and/or propagation (figure 1).3 Multiple clinical risk factors, electrocardiographic/echocardiographic features and biochemical markers are associated with an increased risk of AF (table 1), and, AF can be described in terms of the duration of episodes using a simplified scheme (table 2).3 Figure 1. Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation Table 1. Risk factors3 The aim of treatment is to prevent stroke and alleviate symptoms.4 Drug therapies include antic

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July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) Online First

Correspondence: influences on novel oral anticoagulant prescribing – findings of a NICE scholarship project

Matthew Rogers

Abstract

We read with interest Diana Gorog’s recent article on the uptake of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACS) in the UK.1 She drew attention to the slow uptake of these agents in the UK as opposed to many countries in Europe, and certainly the USA, and to the role that local medicines management committees (MMCs) may play in this. While the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance regarding all three NOACs available in the UK (apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban) is that they should be available as an option for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), many MMCs in the UK have sought to control p

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