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Tag Archives: Spironolactone

October 2017

ESC 2017: New potassium binding drugs reviewed

Kevin Cheng

Abstract

Presenters included cardiologists, Professors Michael Boehm (University of the Saarland, Homburg, Saarland, Germany) and Stefan Anker (University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany) and nephrologist, Matthew Weir (University of Maryland Medical Centre, Baltimore, Maryland, USA). Their presentations are summarised below. The addition of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition or receptor blockade (ARB) has been shown in randomised-controlled trials to improve morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure.1,2 In the EMPHASIS-HF study, the addition of eplerenone in pat

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October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:138–142 Online First

News from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015

BJCardio Staff

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News from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2013

February 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:10–11 Online First

News from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2013

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48: success for edoxaban in AF The new factor Xa inhibitor, edoxaban (Daiichi-Sankyo), was as effective in preventing strokes and safer than warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial. The ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 (Effective AnticoaGulation with Factor XA Next Generation in Atrial Fibrillation – Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 48) trial included more than 21,000 AF patients from 46 countries who were randomised to edoxaban at one of two doses (60 mg or 30 mg per day) or warfarin. Results (table 1) showed that both edoxaban doses were associated with significantly less major bleeding than

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September 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:113–16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.027

Audit of communication with GPs regarding renal monitoring in CHF patients: are we doing well?

Mohamad Z Kanaan, Julie Bashforth, Abdallah Al-Mohammad

Abstract

Introduction Therapeutic interventions in chronic heart failure (CHF) can lead to renal dysfunction. Combination of the aldosterone antagonist (AA) spironolactone with either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), reduced mortality and hospitalisation rates and improved the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class in patients recruited into the Randomised Aldactone Evaluation Study (RALES).1 That study showed no statistically significant difference in the incidence of hyperkalaemia between those on AA and those on placebo.1 However, when the results of the trial were implemented int

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September 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:254-7

10 steps before you refer for: hypertension

Terry McCormack, Francesco P Cappuccio

Abstract

1. Check that the measurement is correct Ensure that they really are poorly controlled by resting the patient for 10 minutes, with the cuff in place to discourage them from standing, before taking at least two measurements, one to two minutes apart. Feel the radial pulse because in arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation automatic sphygmomanometers are inaccurate and therefore traditional devices such as mercury sphygmomanometers must be used. People aged over 80 years and some diabetics may have postural hypotension. This is where the systolic blood pressure drops 20 mmHg on standing or they may have postural symptoms.2 Having made that diag

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May 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:211-8

Aldosterone: an important mediator of cardiac remodelling in heart failure

Allan D Struthers

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January 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:56-60

The present and future role of aldosterone blockade

Allan D Struthers

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No content available

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October 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:533-7

Aldosterone antagonism: new ideas, new drugs

Mike Schachter

Abstract

No content available

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