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Tag Archives: statins

New opportunities for cholesterol lowering: focus on PCSK9 inhibitors

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:91–3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.021

New opportunities for cholesterol lowering: focus on PCSK9 inhibitors

Peter Sever, Judy Mackay

Abstract

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Hyperlipidaemia and monoclonal antibodies – paying for outcome

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:94–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.022

Hyperlipidaemia and monoclonal antibodies – paying for outcome

Gilbert Wagener

Abstract

Dr Gilbert Wagener (Transcrip Partners LLP) Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a new target for the treatment of hyperlipidaemia. PCSK9 is apparently complimentary to 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition with statins.6,7 Most advanced in the development path are two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PCSK9, alirocumab (SAR236533) and evolocumab (AMG145), both subcutaneous injectable drugs administered at bi-weekly or four-weekly intervals. Both compounds demonstrated solid reductions in LDL-C, however, dose selection for both focused on the most effective dose and did not consider titration ac

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NICE guidance updates on statins and secondary prevention

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:9

NICE guidance updates on statins and secondary prevention

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

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Statins: are they wonder drugs?

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:40 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.008

Statins: are they wonder drugs?

Veena Dhawan, Harsimran Sidhu

Abstract

Introduction Since their discovery in the 1970s, statins are widely used in clinics for the treatment of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Statins attenuate the intracellular levels of cholesterol by inhibiting the rate-limiting enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase, either by competing with the normal substrate in the enzyme’s active site, or by altering the conformation of the enzyme by binding to its active site. Lipid-mediated effects Statins exert their lipid-mediated action by decreasing the production of cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), by up-regulation of LDL-receptors and uptake

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s05

Dyslipidaemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease: DYSIS results in the UK

Vian Amber, Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Susan Connolly, Timothy J Bowker, David A Wood, on behalf of the DYSIS Study Group UK 

Abstract

Background Statins are first choice for treatment of dyslipidaemia in both secondary and primary cardiovascular disease prevention. For every 1.0 mmol/L reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‑C), the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality decreases by 19% and overall mortality decreases by 12%.1 Despite statin treatment, a substantial number of cardiovascular events still occur, and one reason may be persistent lipid abnormalities including total cholesterol and LDL-C not at target, or low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or elevated triglycerides. Results from the DYSlipidaemia International Stu

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November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:158–9

More on diabetes risk with statins

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

While the researchers say that that the benefits of statin therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in people with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes are still unequivocal, they suggest that such patients on statins need to focus even more on intensive lifestyle intervention, with a healthy diet, non-smoking, and physical activity. In the study, 2,798 patients at high risk of diabetes were followed for one year. Patients were given counselling on lifestyle interventions; fasting blood glucose was measured at baseline and one year. Results showed that 484 individuals (17.3%) used statins at baseline. Of these patients, 7.5% devel

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:11

Statins associated with increased risk of diabetes

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

In the present study, researchers analysed data from the WHI on 153,840 post-menopausal women, of whom 7% were taking statins at baseline. During the study period, 10,242 incident cases of diabetes were reported. In an unadjusted risk model, statin use at baseline was associated with a 71% increased risk of diabetes, but after adjusting for other risk factors, this was reduced to a 48% increased risk. The association appeared to be a class effect. Risk was increased particularly in white, Hispanic, and Asian women, but not in African American women. The association was also observed at all levels of body mass index (BMI) but women with the lo

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Current prescribing of statins and persistence to statins following ACS in the UK: a MINAP/GPRD study

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:24 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.003

Current prescribing of statins and persistence to statins following ACS in the UK: a MINAP/GPRD study

Rachael Boggon, Susan Eaton, Adam Timmis, Harry Hemingway, Zahava Gabriel, Iqbal Minhas, Tjeerd P van Staa

Abstract

Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in England and Wales (124,000 deaths in 2005) and for every fatality, there are at least two people who have a major non-fatal CVD event.1 Myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is a high risk of recurrence after the initial event. Recommendations on the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease for patients in primary and secondary care have been published in guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in England.1,2 In the May 2008 CG67 guideline, high-intensity dosage of statin

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News from the ESC Congress 2011

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:208–210

News from the ESC Congress 2011

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

ARISTOTLE: apixaban superior to warfarin in AF patients Another oral anticoagulant has shown good results in comparison to warfarin for use in the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The new oral factor Xa inhibitor, apixaban, was superior to warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism and was also associated with less bleeding and lower mortality than warfarin in the ARISTOTLE trial. Apixaban is the third of the new generation of oral anticoagulants to be tested in this indication, and seems to have performed the best. The other two agents – dabigatran and rivaroxaban – have also been shown to be viable

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February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:9-10

Statins and CV events in patients with abnormal liver tests 

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

The study (Lancet 2010;376:1916–22) assessed whether long-term (three year) statin treatment (mainly atorvastatin) is safe and effective in patients thought to have NAFLD. Overall, liver-related adverse effects such as increased levels of liver enzymes or serum transaminases like alanine aminotransferase (ALT) occurred no more often in the group who were given statins. Over three years follow-up, ALT improved or normalised in patients who were given statins, but in the group not taking statins liver tests worsened.

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