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Tag Archives: stroke

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:90

Correspondence: gender and outcome from acute myocardial infarction and secondary stroke

Professor Ivy Shiue; Dr Krasimira Hristova; Professor Jagdish Sharma

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Research on sex difference in mortality after myocardial infarction (MI) since the 1990s has been debated and increased. Several observational studies have shown that younger women, in particular, seemed to have higher mortality rates than men of similar age during the two-year or longer follow-up, although these studies were mainly from the USA.1-3 Recent American studies have also found that, even after full adjustment for potential risk factors, excess risk for in-hospital mortality for women was still noted, particularly among those <50 years old with acute ST-segment elevation MI, leading to 98% (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% c

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Talking about matters of the heart

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:89–90 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.020

Talking about matters of the heart

David Haslam

Abstract

Yet, not all today’s physicians are keeping step with this new world. All too often adopting new ways of talking to patients or prescribing new technologies and medicines is left by the wayside in favour of keeping to tried and tested habits. Treating a common heart disorder Take the case with atrial fibrillation (AF), which affects around 800,000 people in the UK. Anticoagulation to reduce the risk of stroke is an essential part of AF management but according to the Department of Health many patients are not always appropriately anticoagulated.1 Since 2012, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has approved a number

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August 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:92-93 Online First

News from EHRA: encouraging news on anticoagulants

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

With the number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) set to double by 2050, appropriate anticoagulation for this growing condition was highlighted in a special session at the meeting – a ‘State of The Art Lecture’. Professor Stefan H Hohnloser (JW Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany) described how stroke in Europe costs an estimated €38 billion per year, with 20% attributable to AF. Yet a decade ago, around 40% of AF patients did not receive appropriate anticoagulation. Of those receiving therapy, only around 50% of time in therapeutic range (TTR) is seen. With this in mind, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are non-inferior to

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National survey of patients with AF in the acute medical unit: a day in the life survey

July 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:106 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.021 Online First

National survey of patients with AF in the acute medical unit: a day in the life survey

John Soong, Anjali Balasanthiran, Donald C MacLeod, Derek Bell

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrrhythmia, whose sequelae include stroke, heart failure and poor quality of life.1 In parallel with an ageing population, the prevalence of AF is increasing, with persistent or permanent forms affecting 10–15% of the population over the age of 75 years.2-6 The effective management of AF has been a source of recurring debate, leading to the publication of combined American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology (ACC/AHA/ESC), and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines in 2006.7,8 In addition to evidenc

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February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:9-10

BJC supports Stroke Association 2011 initiatives

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

to ensure that primary healthcare professionals (predominantly GPs and practice nurses) are screening, diagnosing and treating AF to optimum levels to raise awareness of AF as a risk factor for stroke amongst the public to lobby national policy makers for improvement in and better implementation of guidance around AF detection/treatment. To raise public awareness, The Stroke Association will be organising advertising campaigns on the dangers of AF. A parliamentary reception is planned to spread awareness amongst and gain support from policymakers. It has also carried out a survey of 1,000 GPs to gauge clinical awareness levels of the link b

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March 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:89–92

Audit of management of atrial fibrillation at a district general hospital

Joanna C E-S Lim, Ajay Suri, Sangeetha Sornalingham, Tuan Peng Chua

Abstract

We audited management of AF at the Royal Surrey County Hospital against standards derived from the NICE guidelines. Fifty-nine of the 663 patients (8.9%) presenting to the acute medical take during the month of May 2008 had a documented diagnosis of AF, 10% of whom presented with a new diagnosis of AF and 90% of whom had a pre-existing diagnosis. The case notes of these 59 patients were reviewed. All patients with a new diagnosis of AF were managed consistently with the NICE guidelines. Compliance for patients with pre-existing AF was much lower. Eighteen out of 31 patients (58%) with pre-existing AF were found to be on digoxin monotherapy on

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March 2010 Br J Cardiol 2009;17(Suppl 1):S10-11

Is dual antiplatelet therapy needed for all CVD patients?

Ranil de Silva

Abstract

Dual antiplatelet therapy for all CVD patients? Table 1. Currently used antiplatelet drugs Currently used antiplatelet drugs are summarised in table 1 and pivotal clinical trials of dual antiplatelet therapy in table 2. The Clopidogrel for High Atherothrombotic Risk and Ischaemia Stabilisation, Management and Avoidance (CHARISMA) trial2 is the only prospective randomised clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dual antiplatelet therapy in all CVD patients. Initiated after the Clopidogrel versus Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischaemic Events (CAPRIE) trial had shown a 9% relative risk reduction with clopidogrel compared w

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November 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:269-71

Increasing treatment window for tPA in stroke

BJCardio editorial staff

Abstract

This new report from ECASS 3 was published online on October 21st in Lancet Neurology. The authors, led by Dr Werner Hacke (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Germany) report that although not all end points were statistically significant, there was “a clear pattern in favour of alteplase”. In the ECASS 3 trial, 821 stroke patients presenting 3-4.5 hours after symptom onset were randomised to alteplase (in the approved regimen of 0.9 mg/kg body weight) or placebo. The primary end point was disability at 90 days, and this was judged by a favourable or unfavourable outcome on the modified Rankin Scale. Results showed that significantly more pati

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:190

REACHing for new heights in disease management

Deepak L Bhatt, P Gabriel Steg

Abstract

In this larger context, the international Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) Registry was launched in order to study outcomes of atherothrombotic disease, risk factors for atherothrombosis, and also current treatment patterns. Already, the REACH Registry has provided insights at a global level.1 For example, under-treatment of common risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and diabetes was observed in all regions included in the REACH Registry. Obesity, including morbid obesity, was highly prevalent. Multivascular disease – atherothrombosis affecting more than one arterial territory – was present in app

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November 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:386-90

News from the Scientific Sessions 2006 of the American Heart Association

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

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