How would British stroke physicians diagnose and treat hypoxia in patients with acute stroke?

Br J Cardiol 2005;12:456-8 Leave a comment
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There is no evidence from randomised controlled trials to guide oxygen treatment after stroke. This survey aims to establish a snapshot of views of clinicians on best current practice relating to the management of hypoxia early after acute stroke.
A postal questionnaire was sent to all 231 members of the British Association of Stroke Physicians (BASP). For 88% of the 130 respondents the decision to give oxygen was guided by the oxygen saturation, and for 67% it was guided by clinical criteria. The mean cut-off for oxygen supplementation suggested was ? 93% SD 2 (range 85–98%). Sixty-seven respondents would give oxygen by nasal cannulae and 74 via face mask. The oxygen concentration selected was 24% (n=17), 28% (n=31), 35% (n=15), 40% (n=3) and 100% (n=3).
This shows there is wide variation amongst stroke physicians about when to start oxygen, how much to give and by which route. There is a need for a randomised clinical trial to guide oxygen therapy after acute stroke.

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