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Tag Archives: anticoagulation

Introduction

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S3–S5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s01

Introduction

Tarek Nafee,
 C Michael Gibson

Abstract

Until recently, warfarin was the drug of choice for patients with atrial fibrillation. Data from the ROCKET-AF (Rivaroxaban Once Daily Oral Direct Factor Xa Inhibition Compared with Vitamin K Antagonism for Prevention of Stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation),1 ARISTOTLE (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation),2 RE-LY (Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy)3 and ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 (Effective Anticoagulation with Factor Xa Next Generation in Atrial Fibrillation-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 48)4 trials demonstrated non-inferior or superior reduction in str

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Anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular AF undergoing PCI: clinical evidence from PIONEER AF-PCI

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S6–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s02

Anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular AF undergoing PCI: clinical evidence from PIONEER AF-PCI

Tarek Nafee, Gerald Chi, Fahad AlKhalfan, Serge Korjian, Yazan Daaboul, Seyedmahdi Pahlavani, Usama Talib, Aravind Reddy Kuchkuntla, Mahshid Mir, Mathieu Kerneis, C Michael Gibson

Abstract

Background, epidemiology and rationale for study The PIONEER AF-PCI (Open-Label, Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Study Exploring Two Treatment Strategies of Rivaroxaban and a Dose-Adjusted Oral Vitamin K Antagonist Treatment Strategy in Subjects with Atrial Fibrillation who Undergo Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) trial addressed an important medical question, which is potentially relevant for the 20–45% of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients who also have coronary artery disease and are likely to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Prior to the PIONEER AF-PCI trial, there was an unmet need for evidence-based recommendati

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June 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:53

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

In the study, patients newly diagnosed with hip fracture from 2005 –2013 were followed until late 2016. Among 34,991 patients, 4602 (13%) received osteoporosis treatment during follow-up. Alendronate was associated with 67% and 45% lower risks of one-year CV death and heart attack, respectively. It was associated with an 18% reduced risk of stroke within five years and a 17% reduced risk of stroke within 10 years. Protective effects were not evident for other classes of osteoporosis treatments. “There is a world-wide crisis in the treatment of osteoporosis, due to patients’ awareness of the extremely rare side effects,” said senior au

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November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:135

Rivaroxaban label update for extended VTE prevention

BJC Staff

Abstract

Current treatment recommendation for the prevention of recurrent VTE is anticoagulation therapy for three months or longer, depending on the balance between the risk of recurrent VTE and the risk of bleeding. However, the risk of patients with unprovoked VTE or with ongoing risk factors experiencing a second event is up to 10% in the first year if treatment is stopped. More than 25,000 people in the UK die from VTE every year. More news in this issue: NICE publishes updated familial hypercholesterolaemia guidance REDUCE shows non-inferiority of short versus long DAPT in acute coronary syndrome Primary Care Cardiovascular Society announces it

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October 2017

ESC 2017: COMPASS steers on anticoagulation in stable cardiovascular disease

Chris Allen

Abstract

Over a mean follow-up of 23 months, there was a marked decrease in the primary composite end point of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction in the combination therapy group by 24% (hazard ration [HR] 0.76; 95% CI 0.66-0.86; p<0.001) over aspirin monotherapy, and improved survival by 18%. The trial terminated prematurely by the data monitoring committee due to due to overwhelming efficacy. Rivaroxaban monotherapy showed no efficacy benefit. The anticipated trade-off was apparent with increased major bleeding in the combination therapy arm (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.40–2.05; p<0.001), although fatal and intracranial bleeds wer

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August 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:120 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.024

Multiple left atrial masses in a patient with breast cancer

Debjit Chatterjee

Abstract

Case A 63-year-old woman presented with breathlessness for a week. She had had a right mastectomy and axillary node clearance three weeks previously for breast cancer. She was known to have rheumatic heart disease and mitral stenosis with history of balloon mitral valvuloplasty 12 years ago. An echocardiogram, which was performed four months before, showed moderate mitral stenosis with valve area of 1.2 cm2, moderate aortic stenosis with peak gradient across aortic valve of 42 mmHg and mean of 22 mmHg and mild tricuspid regurgitation with normal pulmonary artery pressure. She was also known to have permanent atrial fibrillation and was on w

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June 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:61

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Nanoparticles, inhaled from sources such as vehicle exhausts, have been shown to cross from the lungs into the blood stream. They can then accumulate in areas susceptible to heart problems, according to research part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.  Previous studies have identified a correlation but not a causal link between nanoparticles and strokes or cardiovascular disease. It is not currently possible to measure environmental nanoparticles in the blood. So, researchers from the University of Edinburgh, and the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands, used a variety of specialist techniques to t

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News from ACC.17

April 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:49-54 Online First

News from ACC.17

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Tsimane people show healthiest arteries yet studied Indigenous South Americans from the Bolivian Amazon – the Tsimane people – have the lowest recorded levels of vascular ageing A South American Tsimane person of 80 years is estimated to have the same vascular age as an American person in their mid-50s, according to a study presented at the ACC. The Tsimane people – an indigenous forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon – have the lowest reported levels of vascular ageing for any population, with coronary atherosclerosis being five times less common than in the USA. This has led the researchers to propose that the lo

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March 2017 Online First

Anticoagulation news

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Anticoagulant treatment after intracerebral haemorrhage in patients with AF Anticoagulant treatment may be initiated seven to eight weeks after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), to optimise the benefit from treatment and minimise risk, according to a nationwide observational study published recently in Stroke.1 The study aimed to provide observational data on the relationship between the timing of antithrombotic treatment and the competing risks of severe thrombotic and haemorrhagic events in a cohort of Swedish patients with AF and ICH. Patients with AF and a first-ever ICH were identified in the Swed

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February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.006 Online First

Comparison of warfarin dosage needed to achieve target INR before and after cardiac surgery

Cindy San, Doson Chua, Hilary Wu, Jian Ye

Abstract

Introduction Warfarin is an anticoagulant commonly used in atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, prosthetic cardiac valve replacement and postoperative atrial fibrillation.1 Warfarin is usually discontinued prior to cardiac surgery and subsequently re-initiated postoperatively to achieve the target therapeutic international normalised ratio (INR).2 At the cardiac surgery unit of St. Paul’s Hospital, it has been observed that the warfarin dosage needed to achieve therapeutic anticoagulation is often lower post-cardiac surgery, compared with the patient’s warfarin dose prior to cardiac surgery. Serious complications, such as postoper

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