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Tag Archives: anticoagulation

March 2017 Online First

Anticoagulation news

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Anticoagulant treatment after intracerebral haemorrhage in patients with AF Anticoagulant treatment may be initiated seven to eight weeks after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), to optimise the benefit from treatment and minimise risk, according to a nationwide observational study published recently in Stroke.1 The study aimed to provide observational data on the relationship between the timing of antithrombotic treatment and the competing risks of severe thrombotic and haemorrhagic events in a cohort of Swedish patients with AF and ICH. Patients with AF and a first-ever ICH were identified in the Swed

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February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.006 Online First

Comparison of warfarin dosage needed to achieve target INR before and after cardiac surgery

Cindy San, Doson Chua, Hilary Wu, Jian Ye

Abstract

Introduction Warfarin is an anticoagulant commonly used in atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, prosthetic cardiac valve replacement and postoperative atrial fibrillation.1 Warfarin is usually discontinued prior to cardiac surgery and subsequently re-initiated postoperatively to achieve the target therapeutic international normalised ratio (INR).2 At the cardiac surgery unit of St. Paul’s Hospital, it has been observed that the warfarin dosage needed to achieve therapeutic anticoagulation is often lower post-cardiac surgery, compared with the patient’s warfarin dose prior to cardiac surgery. Serious complications, such as postoper

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October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:138–142 Online First

News from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015

BJCardio Staff

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August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:105–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.030

Oral anticoagulation in hospitalised patients with newly diagnosed AF: a story of too little, too late

Shohreh Honarbakhsh, Leigh-Ann Wakefield, Neha Sekhri, Kulasegaram Ranjadayalan, Roshan Weerackody, Mehul Dhinoja, R Andrew Archbold

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with a reported worldwide prevalence of 0.6% in men and 0.4% in women.1 AF is independently associated with a five-fold increased rate of stroke, which is comparable with the risk seen in patients with three or more other stroke risk factors.2,3 Furthermore, strokes related to AF are associated with higher rates of disability and mortality than other strokes.4-6 The cost of AF-related strokes in the UK is estimated to be around £750 million per year.7 AF-related stroke is thought to be secondary to thromboembolism from the left atrium to the cerebral circulation. Ora

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The use of EKOS-catheter-directed thrombolysis in the management of extensive thromboembolism

July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.024 Online First

The use of EKOS-catheter-directed thrombolysis in the management of extensive thromboembolism

Lisa Leung, Aerakondal B Gopalamurugan

Abstract

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Calling the cardioverted: an audit of long-term anticoagulation in patients attending for DCCV

July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.025 Online First

Calling the cardioverted: an audit of long-term anticoagulation in patients attending for DCCV

Philippa Howlett, Michael Hickman, Edward Leatham

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the UK and is estimated to affect 2% of the general population, rising to affect 8% of individuals aged over 75 years.1 Without appropriate antithrombotic therapy, non-valvular AF confers a five-fold risk of stroke and thromboembolism.2 Oral anticoagulation effectively reduces stroke risk by two-thirds.3 Direct current (DC) cardioversion (DCCV) is one strategy to restore sinus rhythm in patients with AF (see figure 1), and has been used in clinical practice since the 1960s. This procedure has relatively high initial success rates, however, it has become increasingly evid

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Talking about matters of the heart

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:89–90 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.020

Talking about matters of the heart

David Haslam

Abstract

Yet, not all today’s physicians are keeping step with this new world. All too often adopting new ways of talking to patients or prescribing new technologies and medicines is left by the wayside in favour of keeping to tried and tested habits. Treating a common heart disorder Take the case with atrial fibrillation (AF), which affects around 800,000 people in the UK. Anticoagulation to reduce the risk of stroke is an essential part of AF management but according to the Department of Health many patients are not always appropriately anticoagulated.1 Since 2012, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has approved a number

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:160

Correspondence: national survey of patients with AF in the acute medical unit: a day in the life survey

Dr John Havard; Dr John Soong

Abstract

National survey of patients with AF in the acute medical unit: a day in the life survey Dear Sirs, The first national survey examining the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) within acute medical units up and down the country has just been published in the British Journal of Cardiology.1 Essentially it seems to show that secondary care is just as bad as primary care in initiating warfarin for AF patients. This group of patients is five times more likely to have a thromboembolic cerebrovascular accident than matched populations in sinus rhythm and yet doctors are ineffective at influencing change. This study took place over a 24-hour period

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November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:155

Highlights from HRC 2012

Drs Janet McComb, André Ng, Henry Purcell, and Andreas Wolff

Abstract

Stroke risk assessment in AF New insights on stroke risk assessment were provided by Dr Ami Banerjee (University of Birmingham), in a session supported by the Atrial Fibrillation Association. Table 1. CHADS2 score The CHADS2 risk stratification scoring system (table 1) is currently the indicator for the Quality and Outcomes (QoF) framework used to determine whether an atrial fibrillation (AF) patient warrants anticoagulation. It may underestimate risk and those with a score of zero may actually be at substantial stroke risk. He also pointed out that the system has inherent disadvantages. It does not include many of the risk factors for stroke

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News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:211-14

News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

Abstract

Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. SHIFT: ivabradine shows benefit in heart failure

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