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Tag Archives: antiplatelet therapy

MI with multiple distal occlusions associated with use of the synthetic cannabinoid 5F-AKB48

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:40 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.012

MI with multiple distal occlusions associated with use of the synthetic cannabinoid 5F-AKB48

Jason L Walsh, Benjamin H L Harris, Nicholas Ossei-Gerning

Abstract

Introduction In recent years, the recreational use of synthetic cannabinoids has been gaining global popularity.1-5 Case reports have emerged associating these compounds with a number of adverse effects, including: embolic-appearing ischaemic strokes,6 seizures7 and acute kidney injury.8 In addition, myocardial infarction (MI) has been associated with synthetic cannabinoid use in teenagers.9,10 However, no cases have demonstrated abnormal coronary angiography. There are numerous synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018, JWH-073, HU-210, CP 47,497, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-210, and newer compounds are regularly being developed.4 A proportion of

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:s3-s4

PCI in the UK – the continuing journey

BJCardio staff

Abstract

Introduction Developments along the way have included better patient selection, improved peri-procedural management of patients and, with newer-generation drugs and devices, better results. Recent hurdles have been confronted, including left main stem disease, complex bifurcation lesions and total chronic occlusions. Similarly, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has become the treatment of choice in acute myocardial infarction. Challenges remain, however, including restenosis. The fine balance between thrombosis and haemostasis demands that we provide more effective and predictable antiplatelet strategies to optimise risk reduct

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:s5-s8

Intervention: who to treat and how? 

BJCardio staff

Abstract

Introduction While primary PCI, rather than thrombolysis, is now the reperfusion treatment of choice for STEMI, the majority of patients coming for revascularisation in the UK have stable coronary disease or NSTE-ACS. In the treatment of NSTE-ACS, first principles involve the selection of patients for diagnostic angiography followed by either PCI or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Rates of PCI are increasing annually in the UK, which, in part, is a reflection of greater awareness of coronary artery disease, its earlier diagnosis and treatment in the ageing population. This section looks at coronary intervention in general, how PCI act

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:s9-s14

Optimising medical treatment of ACS

BJCardio staff

Abstract

Introduction The discovery of the thienopyridines, or ADP receptor antagonists, led to the development of more effective oral antiplatelet agents. Trials assessed dual antiplatelet therapy in high-risk patients versus aspirin alone and the significant benefits observed have resulted in dual antiplatelet therapy becoming a mainstay of treatment. As expected with more potent dual therapy, there is always a fine balance between prevention of thrombosis and bleeding risk. There are still many challenges to overcome. Many patients, such as those with diabetes or with a previous stent thrombosis, are at high risk for further infarction, indicating

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November 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:326–8

The dark side of the drug-eluting stent: stent thrombosis with cessation of dual antiplatelet therapy

Mohaned Egred, Mohammed Andron, Raphael A Perry

Abstract

Introduction The use of drug-eluting stents (DES) has increased exponentially in recent years with a significant improvement in the rates of re-stenosis, target lesion and target vessel revascularisation.1-3 There appears to be little difference in short- to medium-term safety compared with bare metal stenting (BMS).4 Coronary thrombosis after stent implantation is well recognised, resulting in acute myocardial infarction and marked adverse outcome. Typically, it happens in the first 3–10 days after the procedure leading almost always to an acute myocardial infarction and not uncommonly to death. Late (>6 months) stent thrombosis is rare

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September 2007 Br J Cardiol 2007;14:234-6

Stent thrombosis and antiplatelet therapy: a review of 3,004 consecutive patients in a single centre

Nick Curzen, Geraint Morton, Alex Hobson, Iain Simpson, Alison Calver, Huon Gray, Keith D Dawkins

Abstract

Introduction Stent thrombosis (ST) is a potentially life-threatening complication of coronary artery stent placement (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]). Concern about the incidence of ST is greatest in patients treated with drug-eluting stents (DES), in whom some evidence suggests there is a higher incidence than for bare metal stents (BMS).1–3 Recently reported meta-analyses from collections of randomised studies comparing BMS with either Cypher® or Taxus® DES have been interpreted as confirming this increase in risk for these drug-eluting devices.4 It is likely that ST is multi-factorial in its aetiology since evidence demonstra

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July 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:275-82

Should all diabetic patients receive aspirin? Results from recent trials

Nick Barwell, Gillian Marshall, Claire McDougall, Adrian JB Brady, Miles Fisher

Abstract

No content available

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March 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:158-60

Antiplatelet therapy – the education gap

Jonathan Morrell

Abstract

No content available

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