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Tag Archives: atherosclerosis

May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:52

In briefs

BJC Staff

Abstract

Stat tests loaded into the VITROS XT 7600 Moderate alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke Blood pressure and stroke risk increase steadily with increasing alcohol intake, and previous claims that one to two alcoholic drinks a day might protect against stroke are not borne out by new evidence from a genetic study involving 160,000 adults. Studies of East Asian genes, where two common genetic variants strongly affect what people choose to drink, show that alcohol itself directly increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a new study published in The Lancet (doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31772-0). Researc

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News from the Cardiorenal Forum 12th Annual Scientific Meeting – Improving treatments in cardiorenal patients

March 2018

News from the Cardiorenal Forum 12th Annual Scientific Meeting – Improving treatments in cardiorenal patients

Fazlullah Wardak and Rosie Kalsi

Abstract

Do new diabetes drugs protect the heart and kidney? The day’s keynote session was given by Professor Johannes Mann (Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen, Germany). Diabetes management has been transformed with the introduction of newer agents with the promise of cardiovascular and renal protection. The sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are known to reduce the hyperfiltration, which occurs in early diabetic nephropathy. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are incretin mimetics, which have several benefits for diabetes management. The mechanisms by which GLP-1 agonist therapy may reduce blood pressur

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October 2017

ESC 2017: CANTOS – a focus on inflammation and atherosclerosis

Chris Allen

Abstract

Atherosclerosis has long been characterised as a chronic inflammatory condition. Elevation of the non-specific inflammatory marker high sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an accepted predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and its reduction in JUPITER (Justification for the Use of Statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin) and other statin trials has been linked with improved outcomes, even with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels within the normal range.1 Although a specific aetiological link has proven harder to delineate, the cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β), pro-inflammatory messenger of

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Cholesterol: the evolving story – HEART UK 30th annual conference

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:136

Cholesterol: the evolving story – HEART UK 30th annual conference

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

The first day of the conference focused on hyperlipidaemia in children. In the opening address Professor Albert Wiegman (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands) presented compelling data on the importance of screening and identifying children with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) so they can be effectively treated and early cardiovascular events prevented. Professor Albert Wiegman (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands) FH is one of the most common genetic disorders in the world. Both heterozygous, and to a greater extent homozygous FH, can be disabling at a young age and shorten life expectancy. Homozygous familial hypercholesterolae

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Coenzyme Q10 and cardiovascular disease: an overview

October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:160 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.037 Online First

Coenzyme Q10 and cardiovascular disease: an overview

David Mantle

Abstract

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August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:101–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.029

Inflammation is associated with myocardial ischaemia

Kushal Pujara, Ashan Gunarathne, Anthony H Gershlick

Abstract

Introduction Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Chronic subclinical inflammation is a key recognised process in the pathogenesis of CHD, and may play an important role in atherogenesis. Figure 1. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture Atherosclerosis is a complex multi-factorial disease process, which is initiated at the endothelium in response to various forms of injurious stimuli (shear stress, oxidative stress, arterial pressure changes) including inflammation. These factors appear to alter the endothelial cell’s capacity to maintain homeostasis and vascular tone and leads to the so-called endothelial ‘dysfun

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Targeting residual risk: a new approach to treating CVD?

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:108–12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.023

Targeting residual risk: a new approach to treating CVD?

Alan Begg, Iain Findlay

Abstract

Introduction Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease of the large- and medium-sized muscular arteries, which is characterised by endothelial dysfunction, vascular inflammation, and the build up of lipids, cholesterol, calcium, and cellular debris within the intima of the vessel wall. This build up results in plaque formation, vascular remodelling, acute and chronic luminal obstruction, abnormalities of blood flow and diminished oxygen supply to target organs.1 Plaque rupture and thrombosis result in the acute clinical complications of atherosclerosis. The process of atherosclerosis begins early in life and progresses over many decades. Rupture

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19

Introduction: Cardiovascular health and disease prevention in clinical practice

Kornelia Kotseva, Mary Seed, David Wood

Abstract

Promoting cardiovascular health is central to the national strategy to reduce premature mortality in our population. In this supplement, we offer a new approach to cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention through the MyAction preventive cardiology programme, developed by Imperial College London. This nurse-led, multi-disciplinary, family-centred service embraces all patients with atherosclerotic disease – coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease – together with those identified through Health Checks to be at high risk of developing CVD in one community-based programme. In this supplement, we describe the studies that

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s03

MyAction and the new cardiovascular outcomes strategy

David A Wood Full author details can be found here.

Abstract

Introduction Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a single family of diseases with common antecedents requiring a holistic approach to prevention. This is the central theme of the new cardiovascular outcomes strategy for NHS England.1 Atherosclerosis is ubiquitous in the population, manifesting itself in different ways – acute coronary syndromes, transient cerebral ischaemia or claudication – but linked by a common pathology and underlying causes in terms of lifestyle and related risk factors. Many with one expression of this disease commonly suffer from another, and yet each is managed in silos of care through cardiology, stroke and vascul

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What is cardiac rehabilitation achieving for patients with CHD? The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT results

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s04

What is cardiac rehabilitation achieving for patients with CHD? The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT results

Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, David A Wood, on behalf of ASPIRE-2-PREVENT Study Group

Abstract

The main objective of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation in clinical practice is to reduce the risk of future vascular events, to improve quality of life and increase life expectancy. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is recommended by the British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (BACPR).1 This second edition of the Standards and Core Components (SCC) for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation from the BACPR, define CR through seven standards and seven core components for assuring a quality service of care using a multi-disciplinary biological and psychosocial approach.2 However, the implementatio

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