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Tag Archives: British Society for Heart Failure

News from the 10th British Society for Heart Failure Day for revalidation and training

October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(4) Online First

News from the 10th British Society for Heart Failure Day for revalidation and training

Dr Andrew D’Silva

Abstract

Drug therapy From treating dropsy… Treating congestion is an essential role of the heart failure specialist with diuretic therapy being the cornerstone of treatment. There is an evidence vacuum, however, in how best to relieve congestion. For example, which agents to use, at what doses and with what escalation strategy? Dr Peter Cowburn (Southampton General Hospital) delivered an exemplary lecture highlighting the importance of relieving congestion, the current evidence base and practical advice from his personal experience on how best to achieve the goal of euvolaemia. Relieving congestion matters and, when achieved, is associated with lo

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April 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:56-8 Online First

News from the 9th BSH day for revalidation and training

Dr Simon Beggs

Abstract

Cardio-oncology and obstetrics Many cancer therapies are cardiotoxic, and as cancer survival has improved over recent decades so the number of patients living to develop cardiovascular complications of these therapies has risen. A recent position statement by the European Society of Cardiology stresses that “the cured cancer patient of today…[is at risk of becoming]…the heart failure patient of tomorrow”1 and management of these patients increasingly involves a cardiologist. In a highly educational presentation, Dr Zaheer Yousef (University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff) addressed the management of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (

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April 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) Online First

Update from the 8th BSH Day for Revalidation and Training

Abstract

CPET: an overview of “the cardiac cycle” The breathless patient with heart failure and comorbidity can pose a diagnostic conundrum: is the dyspnoea cardiac or respiratory (or something else entirely)? Dr Christopher Boos (Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust) outlined the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) in such situations. CPET integrates a broad range of variables related to cardiorespiratory function, including oxygen uptake and expiratory ventilation, along with blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) tracing. It provides objective information on physiological performance under stress: key output data include peak VO2

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February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) Online First

News from the BSH 18th Annual Autumn Meeting

Parminder Chaggar, Matthew Kahn

Abstract

Bridging the gap: from trials to inner cities Within the field of heart failure, there is a breadth of prognostic therapies derived from large, randomised controlled trials. Professor Iain Squire (Glenfield Hospital, Leicester) described how new treatments require approval in the European Union before they can be implemented into clinical practice within the member states. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) ensures the best use of scientific resources across Europe. While certain classes of technologies must undergo licencing via a centralised procedure, most therapies will be eligible for licensing by one member state on behalf of other na

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In brief

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:99

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

BSH Parliament day Professor Andrew Clark (President of the British Society for Heart Failure) is pictured here (centre) carrying out an echocardiogram in the House of Commons. He was at a BSH event to help raise awareness that a person diagnosed with heart failure is likely to have a worse prognosis than if they were diagnosed with most cancers. This is despite the availability of specialist heart failure services that can have a remarkable impact on a patient’s chance of survival, but for which there is inconsistent access over the UK leading to wide variations in care and outcomes. Over 60 MPs, Peers, and professional and patient groups

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News from the BSH 16th Annual Autumn Meeting

February 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:15 Online First

News from the BSH 16th Annual Autumn Meeting

Colin Cunnington

Abstract

Counting the cost of acute heart failure In the first keynote lecture, Professor John McMurray (BHF Cardiovascular Research Centre, Glasgow) began by addressing the definition of acute heart failure (HF). He felt the term ‘acute’ was unhelpful, as it can be applied to a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, from the rapid onset of acute pulmonary oedema, to the subacute deterioration in chronic HF symptoms (predominantly peripheral oedema) that culminates in hospitalisation. Accordingly, the new 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF)/American Heart Association (AHA) HF guidelines refer to ‘the hospitalised patient’,

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BSH 5th annual heart failure day for training and revalidation

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:(2) Online First

BSH 5th annual heart failure day for training and revalidation

Abstract

A new treatment for acute heart failure? The recently published RELAX-AHF (Efficacy and Safety of Relaxin for the Treatment of Acute Heart Failure) study was a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial carried out in a targeted population of patients with acute HF.1 Relaxin is a physiological hormone that regulates maternal adaptations to pregnancy, increasing cardiac output, renal blood flow, and arterial compliance, alongside decreased peripheral vascular resistance.2,3 Serelaxin is a recombinant human relaxin-2 shown to have beneficial effects on symptoms and outcomes in early studies.4 The primary end points in thi

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July 2012 Online First

Beta blockers underused in the elderly with lung disease

Parminder Chaggar

Abstract

There is incontrovertible, large-scale, randomised-controlled evidence for morbidity and mortality benefit of beta-blockers in heart failure (trials include MERIT-HF, COPERNICUS, CIBIS II),1-3 she said, but the evidence for adverse effects in lung disease is based on animal studies, case reports and small scale human studies.4 Beta blockade in COPD, however, is fully endorsed by The European Society of Cardiology (ESC), National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) and Cochrane reviews.5-7 Dr Hardman’s presentation highlighted for trainees an important area where significant improvements can be achieved. Cardiac and respiratory func

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February 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:16

Care for the individual patient

Abstract

Bureaucracy The mortality rate for heart failure remains unchanged with 11.6% of heart failure (HF) admissions dying as inpatients, and 33% mortality at around one year, according to the most recent data from the National Heart Failure Audit.  This was presented to the meeting by Professor Theresa McDonagh (King’s College Hospital, London). Data collection continues to improve with 85% of NHS trusts submitting data over the preceding 12 month period, she said.  Access to cardiology services was associated with improved outcomes and a higher usage of evidence-based therapy and subsequent access to outpatient HF services. The likely challen

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