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Tag Archives: cardiac resynchronisation therapy

A survey of post-cardiac rhythm device implantation: movement and mobilisation advice in the UK

January 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:14–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.002 Online First

A survey of post-cardiac rhythm device implantation: movement and mobilisation advice in the UK

George Collins, Sarah Hamill, Catherine Laventure, Stuart Newell, Brian Gordon

Abstract

Introduction The number of patients receiving cardiac rhythm devices (CRDs) in the UK continues to grow.1 After device implantation, to reduce the probability of lead displacement and, therefore, re-intervention, patients are often advised to limit certain arm movements and physical activities for a defined period of time.2 Sources of this post-procedure movement and mobilisation advice include manufacturers’ guidelines, national information leaflets and local implanting centre policy. However, there is no consensus guidance on what the advice should be, and no published evidence to show that post-implant movement restrictions reduce compl

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Pacing supplement: Drugs with devices in the management of heart failure

October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 3):S20–S24 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s15

Pacing supplement: Drugs with devices in the management of heart failure

Balrik Singh Kailey, Christopher Allen, Badrinathan Chandrasekaran

Abstract

Introduction Device therapy has revolutionised the landscape of heart failure over the past 10 years. Prior to device therapy, the most important trials in heart failure (HF) management centred on pharmacotherapy. The CONSENSUS (Cooperative North Scandinavian Enalapril Survival Study) trial (1987),1 showed the importance of optimal blockade of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS). Similarly, CIBIS-II (Cardiac Insufficiency Bisoprolol Study II) (1999)2 and RALES (Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study) (1999)3 trials did the same for beta-blockade and spironolactone, respectively. This century, device therapy has also become part

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Latest NICE guidelines on CRT and ICD devices in heart failure may significantly increase implant rates

December 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:155 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.041

Latest NICE guidelines on CRT and ICD devices in heart failure may significantly increase implant rates

Thabo Mahendiran, Oliver E Gosling, Judith Newton, Dawn Giblett, Dan McKenzie, Mark Dayer

Abstract

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Impact of latest NICE guidelines on CRT and ICD implant rates

December 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:134–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.039

Impact of latest NICE guidelines on CRT and ICD implant rates

Andrew J Turley

Abstract

Dr Andrew J Turley (TheJames Cook University Hospital) Despite clear benefits, UK implant rates remain among the lowest in Europe, with wide regional variability seen. This variability is complex and poorly understood.3 One area of inconsistency is between local implementation of international and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance. In 2014, NICE released new guidance (TA314) on the use of ICDs and CRT that are significantly more inclusive than previous versions (TA95/TA120).4-6 There is no longer a need for QRS duration, evidence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or electrophysiological studies for

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September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:119

Book review

Dr Christopher James McAloon

Abstract

Author: Katz S Publisher: Oxford American Cardiology Library, 2013 ISBN: 978-0-19-991708-2, Price: £22.99 This is a concise handbook on all aspects of heart failure diagnosis and management which any healthcare professional is likely to need. It will easily fit into your work bag and be available for when those inevitable questions arise, based on up-to-date clinical guidelines from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the European Society of Cardiology. However, what Stuart Katz does so effectively is to flesh out the latest evidence in a narrat

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In brief

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:58

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

NICE draft guidance on acute heart failure published The draft acute heart failure clinical guideline from the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is now out for consultation with stakeholders. Guideline recommendations, available on http://www.nice.org.uk, include advice that people with suspected acute heart failure should be seen by a specialist team with a heart failure service at hospital. Currently practice is not standardised across hospitals and many patients are not treated by a dedicated service. …and also on ICDs and CRT   Draft technology appraisal guidance on the most clinically and cost-effective impla

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February 2013 Online First

British Society of Heart Failure Young Investigators’ Award

Abstract

Multipolar left ventricular pacing to optimise acute haemodynamic response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy SY Ahsan (presenting author), B Sabberwal, C Hayward, P Lambiase, M Thomas, GG Babu, S Aggarwal, MD Lowe, AWC Chow The Heart Hospital, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London Purpose: Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) reduces morbidity and mortality in a sub-group of patients with heart failure, though up to 30% of patients have no benefit. CRT patients are heterogeneous and an individualised approach to CRT may be needed to increase response rate. We evaluated the impact

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

New ESC Guidelines on heart failure and CVD prevention

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

Heart failure The recommendations on devices, drugs and diagnosis in heart failure were developed by the ESC in collaboration with a heart failure association of the ESC. There have been several major updates since the previous guidance published in 2008.  The new updates include: In devices, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been hailed as a step change in the management of heart failure. LVADs are more reliable and lead to fewer complications than in 2008. Until now, LVADs have been used as a temporary measure in patients awaiting a heart transplant. Professor John McMurray (Glasgow, UK), chairperson of the ESC Clinical Practice

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News from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2010

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:11-3

News from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2010

Abstract

Highlights of the American Heart Association 2010 meeting held in November 2010, in Chicago, USA, included a breakthrough for the treatment of resistant hypertension, and another oral anticoagulant that could be used instead of warfarin in atrial fibrillation patients, without the need for monitoring. RAFT: CRT reduces deaths and hospitalisations in mild heart failure Adding cardiac-resynchronisation therapy (CRT) to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and medication, led to a reduction in deaths and heart failure hospitalistions among patients with mild-to-moderate symptoms of heart failure in the RAFT (Resynchronisation-Defibrilla

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March 2004 Br J Cardiol (Acute Interv Cardiol) 2004;11:AIC 17–AIC 23

Advanced pacing techniques in congestive heart failure

John R Paisey, John M Morgan

Abstract

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