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Tag Archives: cardiac tamponade

September 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:119 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.031

Primary meningococcal Y pericarditis with pericardial effusion resulting in cardiac tamponade

Nicolas Buttinger, Mark Forde, Timothy Williams, Sally Curtis, James Cockburn

Abstract

Case A 35-year-old man, with no past medical history, self-presented to the emergency department at 20:00 with sharp central chest pain across his sternum, worse on inspiration. This was associated with a temperature of 39.1°C and sweating, and had been preceded by a two-day history of viral head-cold symptoms. He had no history of foreign travel, headache, photophobia, or features suggestive of meningism. On examination he looked pale, but was comfortable and alert with a heart rate of 84 beats per minute and a blood pressure of 115/75 mmHg. Routine blood tests showed C-reactive protein (CRP) 39 mg/L, white blood cell count (WBC) 15.9 × 10

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April 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:79–80 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.017 Online First

An unusual cause of pericardial tamponade in pregnancy

Bishav Mohan, Hasrat Sidhu, Rohit Tandon, Rajesh Arya

Abstract

Introduction Pregnancy does not show any specific predisposition to pericardial diseases. The more common form of pericardial involvement in pregnancy is a benign mild pericardial effusion, the incidence of which increases with duration of pregnancy reaching about 40% by the third trimester, resolving uneventfully after delivery.1 Larger effusions should raise clinical concern for an infection, autoimmune disorder or malignancy, which occur sporadically in pregnancy. We report the case of a 34-year-old term pregnant woman who presented with a massive pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. Case A 34-year-old woman presented to the emerge

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July 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:118–20 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.022 Online First

A transitory right bundle branch block

Cristina Aguilera Agudo, Silvia Vilches Soria, Jorge Enrique Toquero Ramos

Abstract

Case report A 72-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for asthenia and general malaise for a week. He had a history of alcoholism, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and peripheral artery disease with stent implantation in both iliac arteries. Five days before, he was admitted to the emergency department for asthenia and was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and secondary congestive heart failure. Therapy with enoxaparin and warfarin was initiated, added to his long-term treatment with aspirin, but his symptoms worsened. On arrival, an ECG was performed showing sinus tachycardia with a narrow QRS complex (figure 1). Echocardiography

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Subxiphoid pericardiocentesis guided by contrast echocardiography in a patient with cardiac tamponade

November 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010; 17:293-95

Subxiphoid pericardiocentesis guided by contrast echocardiography in a patient with cardiac tamponade

Andrew J Turley, Byju Thomas, Richard J Graham

Abstract

Figure 1. (A) Subcostal two-dimensional echocardiogram showing a large pericardial effusion (PE) with collapse of the right ventricular (RV) free wall during diastole. (B) Doppler echocardiography demonstrating marked changes in left ventricular outflow tract velocity during respiratory fluctuations. (C, D) Agitated saline contrast within the pericardial space The patient underwent therapeutic subxiphoid pericardiocentesis guided by contrast echocardiography. Pericardiocentesis is not without risk, and complications include laceration of cardiac chamber or coronary artery, aspiration of ventricular blood, arrhythmias, pneumothorax and punctur

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July 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:312-4

A case of spontaneous tension pneumopericardium

Simon Stacey, Alex W Green, Richard A Best

Abstract

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