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Tag Archives: catheter ablation

The potential for NOACs in cardiac ablation in the UK

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S16–S17 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s04

The potential for NOACs in cardiac ablation in the UK

Adam J Graham, Richard J Schilling

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. Open irrigated catheter, with pores for flow of heparinised saline seen on the tip Susceptibility to stroke is increased around the time of catheter ablation; with ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) being the most prevalent electrophysiological procedure and, thus, the most studied. Pre-ablation of AF, there is an increased risk of thrombus formation in the left atrial appendage; with potential for embolisation during restoration of normal sinus rhythm.1 During ablation, the risk of thromboembolism is accounted for by endothelial injury, hypercoagulability due to contact of blood with foreign surfaces and altered blo

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Outcomes following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in the UK – a single-centre cohort analysis

November 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:271–6

Outcomes following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in the UK – a single-centre cohort analysis

Rohan Gunawardena, Stephen S Furniss, Ewan Shepherd, Giuseppe Santarpia, Stephen W Lord, John P Bourke

Abstract

A total of 100 consecutive patients (age: 49 years [range 37–76]; females: n=17; persistent AF: n=30; CHADS2 score >1: n=7) underwent a first ablation (between January 2004 and May 2007). Ultimately 167 procedures were performed until follow-up censure in May 2009. Complications occurred in 15 patients – acutely in 11, during follow-up in four. Cumulative ‘success’, ‘partial success’, ‘failure’ and ‘clinical success’ rates after 22 ± 14 months were 60%, 26%, 14% and 86%, respectively. ‘Clinical success’ rates for paroxysmal and persistent subgroups were 73% and 47% (first pro

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Mortality and catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:161-2

Mortality and catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

Richard J Schilling, Razeen Gopal

Abstract

The risks of catheter ablation The aim of CA, essentially, is to manipulate catheters around the left atrium and cauterise the sources of AF without causing unnecessary damage, a skill that is technically challenging. This requires aggressive anticoagulation, and can be a time-consuming procedure. Long-term arrhythmia control or cure rates are quoted in excess of 80%, with data from single large-volume centres reporting low complication rates. Whether experience and high volume are associated with a reduction in complication rates is not proven. Cappato et al.4 recently reported an analysis of a retrospective case series looking at the incide

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News from the 59th Annual Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology

May 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:111-5

News from the 59th Annual Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

ACCORD/INVEST: do not aim for normal blood pressure in diabetes patients with CAD The results of two trials comparing intensive versus more conventional blood pressure lowering in patients with diabetes at high cardiovascular risk have suggested that intensive treatment is not necessary and may be harmful in this population. In the ACCORD BP (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes – Blood Pressure) trial, while intensive blood pressure treatment did reduce the risk of stroke, it failed to reduce the overall risk of cardiovascular events in patients and was associated with an increase in adverse events due to antihypertensive ther

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