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Tag Archives: coronary angiography

April 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:46–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.013 Online First

Should invasive coronary angiography be performed by non-cardiologist operators?

Tiffany Patterson, Simon R Redwood

Abstract

Future role? This study by Yasin et al. suggests that there could be a role for experienced nurse operators in the future. However, since the inception of nurse-led angiography in the late 1980s, there have been considerable advancements in the technology and infrastructure within interventional cardiology centres. The number of centres now performing coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) has considerably increased, forming part of a larger group of strategic cardiac networks.4 Diagnostic coronary angiography, and the management of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST-elevation myocardial infarct

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Multiple coronary cameral fistulae

January 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:39–40 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.004 Online First

Multiple coronary cameral fistulae

Hasan Kadhim, Anita Radomski

Abstract

Figure 1. Angiographic still (RAO cranial) demonstrating left anterior descending (LAD) draining to the right ventricle (RV) Five months later, the patient reported continuing on/off episodes of minimal exertional shortness of breath and intermittent atypical chest pain. Echocardiogram and coronary angiography were arranged. Echocardiograph showed a preserved left ventricular systolic function. Ejection fraction: 55% with mild anterior septal hypokinetic wall. Coronary angiography: left main stem (LMS) and dominant left circumflex (LCx) were normal. The left anterior descending (LAD) artery was normal, however, the distal part appeared to dra

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Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: case report and review

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:79–81 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.022

Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: case report and review

Kully Sandhu, David Barron, Hefin Jones, Paul Clift, Sara Thorne, Rob Butler

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. Diagnostic coronary angiogram via right femoral artery illustrating the presence of a large tortuous right coronary artery (RCA) with collaterals filling the left coronary arterial system (LCA) and retrograde flow of contrast within the main pulmonary artery (PA) Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery is a rare congenital condition that often proves fatal in infants. However, we present a case of a young patient presenting with angina-like chest pains since childhood, who subsequently underwent successful surgical correction resulting in alleviation of symptoms. Case report A 25-year-old

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Anomalous coronary artery origin: all three arising from right coronary cusp from separate ostia

February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:39 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.005 Online First

Anomalous coronary artery origin: all three arising from right coronary cusp from separate ostia

Vickram Singh, Jeffrey Khoo

Abstract

Figure 1. Anteroposterior (AP) view, showing the hypoplastic left anterior descending (LAD) arising from right coronary cusp Introduction Coronary anomalies are congenital abnormalities in the coronary anatomy of the heart. They are found in approximately 1% of the population undergoing coronary angiography,1 and are often associated with other structural heart disease. Coronary artery anomalies are a cause of sudden death in the young athlete in the absence of additional heart abnormalities. The aim of this report is to revise this important but often neglected topic, its clinical implications, and to discuss a rare case that was recently en

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Audit of cardiac catheterisation in a DGH: implications for training and patient safety 

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:118–19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.029

Audit of cardiac catheterisation in a DGH: implications for training and patient safety 

Yasir Parviz, Alex Rothman, C Justin Cooke 

Abstract

Introduction In the modern era, patient safety has become one of the most important issues facing doctors and institutions. Cardiology is a craft speciality. Procedures must be learnt by trainees, but there is a risk, in so doing, of harming patients. The purpose of this study was to ask whether it is possible, albeit within a single institution, to provide training in coronary angiography at a district general hospital (DGH) without causing harm, by comparing the complication rate of trainees with consultants in a large case series. Methods Between August 2010 and December 2013, procedural complications resulting from cardiac catheterisation

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Do NICE tables overestimate the prevalence of significant CAD?

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:75 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.017

Do NICE tables overestimate the prevalence of significant CAD?

Jaffar M Khan, Rowena Harrison, Clare Schnaar, Christopher Dugan, Vuyyuru Ramabala, Edward Langford

Abstract

Introduction There is no universal definition for stable angina, as there is for acute coronary syndrome.1 The diagnosis may be based on clinical history alone or on clinical history supplemented by functional testing, or angiography, or both. Angina pectoris is most often due to obstruction to flow in the epicardial coronary arteries, and the ‘gold-standard’ investigation, to date, to detect this, has been invasive coronary angiography.2 A small proportion of patients may have angina with unobstructed coronary arteries secondary to either microvascular coronary disease or coronary spasm.3 Functional ischaemia is not routinely tested for

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Is angiography overused for the investigation of suspected coronary disease? A single-centre study

April 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:77 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.012 Online First

Is angiography overused for the investigation of suspected coronary disease? A single-centre study

Colin J Reid, Mark Tanner, Conrad Murphy

Abstract

Introduction For many years coronary angiography (CA) has been used as the gold standard in the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and even a normal result is considered a worthwhile outcome.1 However, concern has been raised about the use and overuse of what is an invasive and expensive procedure.2-4 We examined our cardiac catheter database to assess our diagnostic yield in terms of detecting CAD, and also in terms of subsequent referral for coronary revascularisation, whether this be by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG), in a population of patients being assessed for possible CAD.

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Feasibility of using CTCA in patients with acute low-to-intermediate likelihood chest pain in a DGH

February 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:39 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.002 Online First

Feasibility of using CTCA in patients with acute low-to-intermediate likelihood chest pain in a DGH

Michael Michail, Shubra Sinha, Mohamed Albarjas, Kate Gramsma, Toby Rogers, Jonathan Hill, Khaled Alfakih

Abstract

Introduction Multi-detector computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is becoming increasingly available in UK Hospitals. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline 95, released in 2010, recommended the use of calcium score ± CTCA in patients with low likelihood chest pain of recent onset.1 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) appropriateness criteria for CTCA recommend its use in patients with low or intermediate likelihood chest pain.2 The rationale for the recommendations of CTCA is its excellent negative-predictive value.3 A further important point is that fu

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October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:217

Correspondence

Drs Ewan J McKay, Tina Tian, Nick Gerning, Chris Sawh, Pankaj Garg, John Purvis, Sinead Hughes and Mark Noble

Abstract

When the dentist said: “Be still your beating heart!” Dear Sirs, We all often encounter a patient history and apparent presenting complaint that we can not precisely and cleverly explain. Our patient, Mr BW, a fit and active 53-year-old man, attended a routine appointment as an outpatient. He had done this many times previously as he was experiencing difficuties with heart rate control and troubling symptoms secondary to atrial fibrillation (AF). Coincidentally, he had also had amalgam dental fillings drilled some 18 months previously. Since then, his cardiac problems had escalated. There appeared no clear causality between the fillings a

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MDCT coronary angiography: does the benefit justify radiation burden?

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:207–08

MDCT coronary angiography: does the benefit justify radiation burden?

Khaled Alfakih, Mathew Budoff 

Abstract

MDCT coronary angiography (CTCA) has been shown to be highly accurate at detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) with more than 30 studies and several meta-analyses confirming excellent sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV), when compared with invasive X-ray coronary angiography.1 This was confirmed in three multi-centre trials: Assessment by Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography of Individuals Undergoing Invasive Coronary Angiography (ACCURACY) (n=230), Coronary Artery Evaluation Using 64-Row Multi-detector Computed Tomography Angiography (CORE-64) (n=291), and Meijboom et al. (n=360)2-4 (table 1). The positive predictive value

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