This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: coronary artery disease

November 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:133

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes cuts costs Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs and also travel costs for patients, especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study shows. The study, carried out in Northern Karelia by the University of Eastern Finland, found that by replacing half of the required follow-up visits for type 2 diabetes with self-measurements and electronic feedback, total costs of glycated haemoglobin monitoring were reduced by nearly 60%. The annual per-patient cost was down from 280 euros to 120 euros. Fewer follow-u

| Full text

October 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(4) doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.028 Online First

Current diagnostic yield of invasive coronary angiography at a district general hospital

Ali Rauf, Sarah Denny, Floyd Pierres, Alice Jackson, Nikolaos Papamichail, Antonis Pavlidis, Khaled Alfakih

Abstract

Introduction Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the cornerstone of diagnosis and treatment of patients with a high likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD), or those with significant or unstable chest pain symptoms. However, there is always a concern that we overutilise ICA and this exposes patients to a small risk.1 Furthermore, ICA is an expensive procedure and overuse of diagnostic ICA can compete with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and device implantations in hospitals with a single catheter lab. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2010 guidelines on stable chest pain, recommended that patien

| Full text

August 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:97

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

A new gene therapy that targets the heart and requires only one treatment session, has been found safe for patients with coronary artery disease, according to a successful trial carried out in Finland (doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx352). The treatment enhances circulation in ischaemic heart muscle and the effects were still visible one year after treatment. The randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled phase 1/2a trial was carried out in collaboration between the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio University Hospital and Turku PET Centre. The biological bypass is based on gene transfer in which a natural human growth factor, AdVEGF-DΔNΔC, a ne

| Full text

April 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:66-7 doi:http://doi.org/10.5837/bjc.2017.009 Online First

Does CTCA improve the diagnostic yield from conventional coronary angiography? A DGH experience

Colin Reid, Mark Tanner, Hatef Mansoubi, Conrad Murphy

Abstract

Introduction Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is an established and validated alternative to invasive coronary angiography (ICA).1 The extent to which CTCA can replace ICA is controversial.2 The low diagnostic yield from ICA suggest there is ample scope to select patients more efficiently for investigation.3 In 2010, in the UK, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)4 published new guidelines for the investigation of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), which incorporated CTCA as a first-line investigation.5 In keeping with these guidelines, we ceased to use exercise testing as a primary t

| Full text

August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:101–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.029

Inflammation is associated with myocardial ischaemia

Kushal Pujara, Ashan Gunarathne, Anthony H Gershlick

Abstract

Introduction Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Chronic subclinical inflammation is a key recognised process in the pathogenesis of CHD, and may play an important role in atherogenesis. Figure 1. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture Atherosclerosis is a complex multi-factorial disease process, which is initiated at the endothelium in response to various forms of injurious stimuli (shear stress, oxidative stress, arterial pressure changes) including inflammation. These factors appear to alter the endothelial cell’s capacity to maintain homeostasis and vascular tone and leads to the so-called endothelial ‘dysfun

| Full text
Vive la différence?

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:22–4

Vive la différence?

Michael Norell

Abstract

Dr Mike Norell I was asked recently to speak at a fringe meeting that was juxtaposed to a major interventional gathering in London. My brief, ‘Gender differences in PCI outcomes’, was not a subject with which I was immediately familiar, and nor was it one upon which I was known to be authoritative, so my initial reaction was along the lines of “why me?”. The four other speakers were all women with both well-established and well-deserved reputations as acknowledged experts in this area. Thus for a number of reasons – some more obvious than others – I was clearly going to be the odd man out.  On the face of it my work was not going

| Full text

February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:27–30 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.003 Online First

Incidence of cardiac surgery following PCI: insights from a high-volume, non-surgical, UK centre

Andrew Whittaker, Peregrine Green, Giles Coverdale, Omar Rana, Terry Levy

Abstract

Introduction It is accepted that coronary revascularisation with coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) provides both symptomatic and prognostic benefit in patients with multi-vessel coronary artery disease (mvCAD).1,2 Both percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and CABG provide better relief of angina symptoms than medical therapy alone.1,3 Large, randomised-controlled trials (RCTs), in recent years, have demonstrated that CABG offers an improved outcome in patients with complex three-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD), especially in those with co-existing diabetes mellitus.4,5 However, in patients with one- or two-vessel CAD, PCI o

| Full text
Do NICE tables overestimate the prevalence of significant CAD?

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:75 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.017

Do NICE tables overestimate the prevalence of significant CAD?

Jaffar M Khan, Rowena Harrison, Clare Schnaar, Christopher Dugan, Vuyyuru Ramabala, Edward Langford

Abstract

Introduction There is no universal definition for stable angina, as there is for acute coronary syndrome.1 The diagnosis may be based on clinical history alone or on clinical history supplemented by functional testing, or angiography, or both. Angina pectoris is most often due to obstruction to flow in the epicardial coronary arteries, and the ‘gold-standard’ investigation, to date, to detect this, has been invasive coronary angiography.2 A small proportion of patients may have angina with unobstructed coronary arteries secondary to either microvascular coronary disease or coronary spasm.3 Functional ischaemia is not routinely tested for

| Full text

June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:78 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.018

A UK cardiac centre experience of low-risk, stable chest pain patients with calcium score of zero

Muhammad Ali Abdool, Reza Ashrafi, Michael Davies, Santosh Raga, Huw Lewis-Jones, Erica Thwaite, Peter Wong, Gershan Davis

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
Is angiography overused for the investigation of suspected coronary disease? A single-centre study

April 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:77 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.012 Online First

Is angiography overused for the investigation of suspected coronary disease? A single-centre study

Colin J Reid, Mark Tanner, Conrad Murphy

Abstract

Introduction For many years coronary angiography (CA) has been used as the gold standard in the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and even a normal result is considered a worthwhile outcome.1 However, concern has been raised about the use and overuse of what is an invasive and expensive procedure.2-4 We examined our cardiac catheter database to assess our diagnostic yield in terms of detecting CAD, and also in terms of subsequent referral for coronary revascularisation, whether this be by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG), in a population of patients being assessed for possible CAD.

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now