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Tag Archives: direct current cardioversion (DCCV)

Use of NOAC drugs in DC cardioversion for patients with non-valvular AF

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S18–S20 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s05

Use of NOAC drugs in DC cardioversion for patients with non-valvular AF

Craig S Barr

Abstract

Introduction Direct current cardioversion (DCCV) is a frequently used and effective strategy for the restoration of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that is persistent and of recent onset. It has been undertaken for almost 60 years.1 While thromboembolic events are associated with this procedure, prior anticoagulation reduces this risk to less than 1%.2 Anticoagulation is given to patients for at least three weeks prior to the procedure and maintained long term, unless they are at low future risk of stroke and systemic embolism (which is very few patients presenting for cardioversion), namely men with a CHA2DS2-VASc sco

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Calling the cardioverted: an audit of long-term anticoagulation in patients attending for DCCV

July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.025 Online First

Calling the cardioverted: an audit of long-term anticoagulation in patients attending for DCCV

Philippa Howlett, Michael Hickman, Edward Leatham

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the UK and is estimated to affect 2% of the general population, rising to affect 8% of individuals aged over 75 years.1 Without appropriate antithrombotic therapy, non-valvular AF confers a five-fold risk of stroke and thromboembolism.2 Oral anticoagulation effectively reduces stroke risk by two-thirds.3 Direct current (DC) cardioversion (DCCV) is one strategy to restore sinus rhythm in patients with AF (see figure 1), and has been used in clinical practice since the 1960s. This procedure has relatively high initial success rates, however, it has become increasingly evid

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