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Tag Archives: exercise

April 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(2) doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.015 Online First

Avoiding needless deaths in aortic stenosis

John B Chambers

Abstract

Professor John B Chambers Introduction Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common type of primary heart valve disease in industrialised countries. Although echocardiography is key for its assessment, the need for surgery is most frequently dictated by symptoms.1 However, the history can be surprisingly elusive, and physicians without specialist competencies in valve disease may miss their onset.2 This is important because the risk of death is approximately 1% per annum without symptoms but 4% in the first three months after the onset of symptoms,3 usually before the patient has time to contact their physician (figure 1). It then rises up to 14%

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Delivering early rehabilitation after an exacerbation of heart failure: is it feasible? A short report

February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.004 Online First

Delivering early rehabilitation after an exacerbation of heart failure: is it feasible? A short report

Linzy Houchen-Wolloff, Amye Watt, Sally Schreder, Sally Singh

Abstract

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In brief

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:99

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

BSH Parliament day Professor Andrew Clark (President of the British Society for Heart Failure) is pictured here (centre) carrying out an echocardiogram in the House of Commons. He was at a BSH event to help raise awareness that a person diagnosed with heart failure is likely to have a worse prognosis than if they were diagnosed with most cancers. This is despite the availability of specialist heart failure services that can have a remarkable impact on a patient’s chance of survival, but for which there is inconsistent access over the UK leading to wide variations in care and outcomes. Over 60 MPs, Peers, and professional and patient groups

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In brief

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:136-7

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Caffeine intake may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes Coffee and caffeine intake may significantly reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes, according to a new meta-analysis published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and EMBASE. The fixed- or random-effect pooled measure was selected based on between-study heterogeneity. Dose–response relationship was assessed. Commenting on the implications of this study (doi: 10.1007/s00394-013-0603-x), London general practitioner Dr Sarah Jarvis said: “There is growing evidence to suggest that moderate coffee consumption, that’s four

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In brief

June 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:56

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

ESC backs regulations for medical devices The European Society of Cardiology has said in a position paper that it welcomes the European Commission’s (EC) proposals for a new Regulation to govern the evaluation and approval of medical devices in Europe as an important step towards improving patient safety. The EC proposal document is available at http://ec.europa.eu/health/medical-devices/documents/revision/index_en.htm New risk analysis scoring system A new risk scoring system, based on the SMART study, allows doctors to determine more accurately the risk of cardiovascular disease patients developing a new event, such as heart attack or str

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A pilot study to investigate the safety of exercise training and testing in cardiac rehabilitation patients

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:78 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.012 Online First

A pilot study to investigate the safety of exercise training and testing in cardiac rehabilitation patients

Garyfallia Pepera, Paul D Bromley, Gavin R H Sandercock

Abstract

Introduction Exercise is well recognised as a tool for assessment, prevention and management of cardiovascular disease.1 Cardiac patients are encouraged to attend cardiac rehabilitation programmes including elements of supervised exercise. Such programmes can reduce mortality and morbidity rates by up to 27%.2,3 Despite the benefits derived from participation in exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, exercise itself may act as a trigger for myocardial ischaemia or cardiac arrest in patients with established coronary heart disease.4 During rehabilitation, cardiovascular event rates range from 12.3 to 37.4 per million patient hours of exercise.

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The exercise debate

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:53–4 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.012

The exercise debate

Fiona Milligan

Abstract

Historically, CR programmes have been under funded and under resourced; this has resulted predominantly from the absence of a CR specific tariff resulting in the inclusion of the service into the broader cardiology tariff or service level agreements between commissioners and providers. This could be about to change with the proposed introduction of payment by results recognising CR programmes as cost-effective interventions that produce substantial health benefits.2 Resources Resources, at the most basic level, are defined as appropriately qualified staff to deliver exercise programmes within suitable venues. Current recommendations for exerc

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March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16

Lipids and CVD: improving practice and clinical outcome

Abstract

This supplement is a report from the inaugural meeting of the Cardiometabolic Forum, jointly organised by the British Journal of Cardiology and HEART UK – The Cholesterol Charity. The meeting was held at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, London, on 24th November 2011. Meeting chairs were Dr Dermot Neely (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne) for HEART UK, and Dr Henry Purcell (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, and Editor) for BJC. We hope this supplement will provide readers with an independent overview on recent developments in our knowledge of cholesterol metabolism and its implications for clinical practice. Speakers Dermot Neely

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Improving dyslipidaemia management: focus on lifestyle intervention and adherence

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 1):s1-s16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s03

Improving dyslipidaemia management: focus on lifestyle intervention and adherence

Adie Viljoen

Abstract

The global epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, largely due to overconsumption and sedentary lifestyle, is a major challenge facing clinicians. In the UK, as in the European Region, the prevalence of obesity is rapidly increasing, highlighting a growing health challenge.1 In England (2003 data), 65% of males and 55% of females aged 16 years or more are either overweight or obese.1 As a consequence, the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, of which dyslipidaemia (elevated triglycerides and low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol) and central obesity are key features,2 is increasing. Therapeutic lifestyle intervent

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August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:158–9

Old problems, new solutions: the HEART UK annual conference

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Heart hotspots campaign The North/South divide in coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality remains significant despite improvements in cardiovascular disease (CVD) care, according to the ‘Heart Hotspots’ campaign launched at this year’s conference. The North West region has the highest mortality (93.72 per 100,000) versus South Central, which showed the lowest mortality (65.59 people per 100,000), according to NHS Information Centre data highlighted by the campaign (figure 1).1 CHD mortality in Tameside and Glossop, near Manchester, is almost four times as high as for those living in Kensington and Chelsea, London (140.84 vs. 36.91 people

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