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Tag Archives: gender

Vive la différence?

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:22–4

Vive la différence?

Michael Norell

Abstract

Dr Mike Norell I was asked recently to speak at a fringe meeting that was juxtaposed to a major interventional gathering in London. My brief, ‘Gender differences in PCI outcomes’, was not a subject with which I was immediately familiar, and nor was it one upon which I was known to be authoritative, so my initial reaction was along the lines of “why me?”. The four other speakers were all women with both well-established and well-deserved reputations as acknowledged experts in this area. Thus for a number of reasons – some more obvious than others – I was clearly going to be the odd man out.  On the face of it my work was not going

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News from the Cardiorenal Forum 9th Annual Scientific Meeting – embracing the future, not forgetting the past

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:17

News from the Cardiorenal Forum 9th Annual Scientific Meeting – embracing the future, not forgetting the past

Dr Legate Philip

Abstract

Managing risk factors – the old offenders Diet An update on diet and cardiovascular disease was given by Professor Kay Tee Khaw (University of Cambridge). A surprise recent finding has been that increased body mass index (BMI) trends do not directly correlate with cardiovascular mortality, particularly in Mediterranean countries (figure 1). Figure 1. Body mass index and associated coronary heart disease in Europe. Panel a) body mass index; panel b) coronary heart disease This gives rise to the question: is diet a key moderating factor in the relationship between BMI and cardiovascular mortality? The PREDIMED (Effects of the Mediterranean Di

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September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:90

Correspondence: gender and outcome from acute myocardial infarction and secondary stroke

Professor Ivy Shiue; Dr Krasimira Hristova; Professor Jagdish Sharma

Abstract

Dear Sirs, Research on sex difference in mortality after myocardial infarction (MI) since the 1990s has been debated and increased. Several observational studies have shown that younger women, in particular, seemed to have higher mortality rates than men of similar age during the two-year or longer follow-up, although these studies were mainly from the USA.1-3 Recent American studies have also found that, even after full adjustment for potential risk factors, excess risk for in-hospital mortality for women was still noted, particularly among those <50 years old with acute ST-segment elevation MI, leading to 98% (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% c

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