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The PIONEER AF-PCI study: its implications for everyday practice in the UK

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S12–S15 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s03

The PIONEER AF-PCI study: its implications for everyday practice in the UK

Jason Glover

Abstract

Introduction We are in a challenging era of increasing use of coronary stenting for coronary artery disease (CAD) in the UK,1 in conjunction with a growing population of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) predominantly driven by age, hypertension, obesity and diabetes.2 Inevitably, these two common diseases, with similar risk factors, occur simultaneously in a significant proportion (5 to 8%) of patients undergoing revascularisation.3-5 This equates to an estimated 4,500 to 7,200 patients in the UK population, based upon British Cardiovascular Intervention Society (BCIS) data in 2014.1 Atrial phase thrombus has a stasis and fibrin drive,

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Acute heart failure – a call to action

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 2):S1–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s02

Acute heart failure – a call to action

Professor Martin Cowie, Professor Derek Bell, Mrs Jane Butler, Professor Henry Dargie, Professor Alasdair Gray, Professor Theresa McDonagh, Dr Hugh McIntyre, Professor Iain Squire, Dr Jacqueline Taylor, Ms Helen Williams

Abstract

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Optimising hypertension treatment: NICE/BHS guideline implementation and audit for best practice

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 1): S1–S16 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s01

Optimising hypertension treatment: NICE/BHS guideline implementation and audit for best practice

Dr Terry McCormack, Dr Chris Arden, Dr Alan Begg, Professor Mark Caulfield, Dr Kathryn Griffith, Ms Helen Williams

Abstract

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Feasibility of using CTCA in patients with acute low-to-intermediate likelihood chest pain in a DGH

February 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:39 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.002 Online First

Feasibility of using CTCA in patients with acute low-to-intermediate likelihood chest pain in a DGH

Michael Michail, Shubra Sinha, Mohamed Albarjas, Kate Gramsma, Toby Rogers, Jonathan Hill, Khaled Alfakih

Abstract

Introduction Multi-detector computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is becoming increasingly available in UK Hospitals. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) clinical guideline 95, released in 2010, recommended the use of calcium score ± CTCA in patients with low likelihood chest pain of recent onset.1 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) appropriateness criteria for CTCA recommend its use in patients with low or intermediate likelihood chest pain.2 The rationale for the recommendations of CTCA is its excellent negative-predictive value.3 A further important point is that fu

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

New ESC Guidelines on heart failure and CVD prevention

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

Heart failure The recommendations on devices, drugs and diagnosis in heart failure were developed by the ESC in collaboration with a heart failure association of the ESC. There have been several major updates since the previous guidance published in 2008.  The new updates include: In devices, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been hailed as a step change in the management of heart failure. LVADs are more reliable and lead to fewer complications than in 2008. Until now, LVADs have been used as a temporary measure in patients awaiting a heart transplant. Professor John McMurray (Glasgow, UK), chairperson of the ESC Clinical Practice

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In brief

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:112–3

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

EVINCI study completed The prevalence of “significant” coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain symptoms is lower than expected in Europe, according to preliminary findings from the The EValuation of INtegrated Cardiac Imaging (EVINCI) study. Once the final analysis is completed, the EVINCI study is expected to demonstrate that performing adequate non-invasive imaging screening of patients with suspected coronary artery disease could safely avoid invasive procedures in 75 out of 100 patients.  The study will have sufficient power to answer the question of which is the most cost-effective non-invasive imaging strategy for the j

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Omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease: re-assessing the evidence

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:79–84 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.016

Omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease: re-assessing the evidence

Alan Begg, Susan Connolly, Julian Halcox, Agnes Kaba, Linda Main, Kausik Ray, Henry Purcell, Helen Williams, Derek Yellon

Abstract

Background Observations on fish consumption in general Populations who consume large amounts of oily fish in their diet tend to have lower rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Fish oils are rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which have demonstrable cardioprotective properties. In line with these observations, extensive epidemiological data – including large meta-analyses – demonstrate clear associations between both increased fish consumption and increased omega-3 PUFA levels with a favourable cardiovascular prognosis.1-3 Most of the evidence for benefits has been observed in individuals

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August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:178

Lifestyle advice and drug therapy post-myocardial infarction: a survey of UK current practice

Julian Halcox, Steven Lindsay, Alan Begg, Kathryn Griffith, Alison Mead, Beverly Barr 

Abstract

Introduction Myocardial infarction (MI) is a common condition, estimated to affect almost 150,000 people per year in the UK.1 Without effective treatment, the immediate mortality of MI approaches 40% with a further 10% of patients dying in the subsequent year.2 In those who survive the initial post-MI period, an increased risk of death from cardiovascular causes (5% per year) persists indefinitely.2 However, effective secondary prevention measures can significantly reduce this risk.3 An estimated 1.4 million people in the UK have had an MI.4 Reducing morbidity and mortality among this group requires effective secondary prevention measures. In

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Familial hypercholesterolaemia –  a developing English scandal

April 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:54−5

Familial hypercholesterolaemia – a developing English scandal

Jonathan Morrell

Abstract

Findings Nearly 70% of eligible PCTs responded to this survey, with many PCTs admitting to a lack of formal planning for FH, and incomplete knowledge about relevant FH services. Looking at the results as a whole, I think it is safe to say that the failure to implement the guidelines at PCT level suggests that national guidance is not always given local priority. More than 40% of the respondents admitted to a shortage of specialist care for people with FH, including adults, children and pregnant women. A number of PCTs indicated that they face barriers to treating FH patients and these concerns need to be addressed immediately if the guidelin

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Should the BSE collaborate with the BSG on intravenous sedation?

May 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:103

Should the BSE collaborate with the BSG on intravenous sedation?

Terry McCormack

Abstract

Gastroenterology guidelines The British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) guidelines suggest that the opiate is used before the benzodiazepine.3 The BSG guidelines also suggest a maximum dose of 5 mg midazolam and 50 mg pethidine. Mankia et al. seem to permit 10 mg midazolam and 75 mg pethidine in their proposed protocol. Such doses would seem excessive unless you have confidence in your ability to provide assisted ventilation. In the survey nobody appears to have used more than 50 mg pethidine and, therefore, practitioners appear to set their own sensible cut-off points. In gastroscopy, sedation is often avoided, however, the TEE is of a mu

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