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Tag Archives: PCSK9

November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:136

Cholesterol – a problem solved?

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Genetic disease The benefits of child-parent screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), were explored by Professor David Wald (Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London). Detection rates are highest if FH is screened for in children between one to two years of age – a heel prick test, for example, is quick to carry out at routine immunisation appointments and uptake rates of 84% have been achieved. Screening is effective – a rate of four children and four parents are identified for every 1,000 children screened. The child benefits twice: their

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In brief

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:53–4

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published recommendations supporting the use of two new lipid-lowering agents – both PCSK9 inhibitors, which inhibit the body’s natural system for eliminating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). A Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) has been published for evolocumab (Repatha®, Amgen) recommending it be used alone or in combination with other cholesterol-lowering therapies, for several types of patients at particularly high risk of cardiovascular events with persistently high cholesterol despite maximal tolerated lipid-lowering therapy.  The NICE recommendation is

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August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:92–3

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

PCSK9 approvals in Europe Two agents in a new cholesterol-lowering class – the PCSK9 inhibitors, which use human monoclonal antibodies to target PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) – have received European approval for lowering cholesterol. Evolocumab (Repatha®, Amgen) is the first PCSK9 inhibitor to be granted marketing authorisation by the European Commission (EC) for use in people with primary hypercholesterolaemia or mixed dyslipidaemia, or in homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia, who are unable to reach low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals with an optimal dose of statin (or a statin and other lipi

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News from ACC.15

April 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(2) Online First

News from ACC.15

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Too much sitting increases coronary artery calcification Sitting for many hours per day is associated with increased coronary artery calcification, a marker of subclinical heart disease, a new study suggests. The study found no association between coronary artery calcification (CAC) and the amount of exercise a person gets, suggesting that too much sitting might have a greater impact than exercise on this particular measure of heart health. The results suggest that exercise may not entirely counteract the negative effects of a mostly sedentary lifestyle on coronary artery calcium. Presenting the study at the ACC meeting, Dr Jacquelyn Kulinski

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News from the Cardiorenal Forum 9th Annual Scientific Meeting – embracing the future, not forgetting the past

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:17

News from the Cardiorenal Forum 9th Annual Scientific Meeting – embracing the future, not forgetting the past

Dr Legate Philip

Abstract

Managing risk factors – the old offenders Diet An update on diet and cardiovascular disease was given by Professor Kay Tee Khaw (University of Cambridge). A surprise recent finding has been that increased body mass index (BMI) trends do not directly correlate with cardiovascular mortality, particularly in Mediterranean countries (figure 1). Figure 1. Body mass index and associated coronary heart disease in Europe. Panel a) body mass index; panel b) coronary heart disease This gives rise to the question: is diet a key moderating factor in the relationship between BMI and cardiovascular mortality? The PREDIMED (Effects of the Mediterranean Di

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October 2014 Online First

Lipid highlights from ESC 2014

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

LDL debate All guidelines agree that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is the primary lipid target, Irrespective of confusion following the publication of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline on cholesterol management,1 which is broadly similar to new NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) recommendations.2 But questions remain as to what is more relevant for reducing the risk of CVD: how you lower LDL-C or to what extent? This issue was the focus of a hot debate between leading experts, at the symposium: ‘New frontiers in cholesterol management in high CV risk patien

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August 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:103

News from the European Atherosclerosis Society Congress

BJCardio Staff and others

Abstract

Lowering LDL-cholesterol: we need to do better It is essential that high-risk patients attain the recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol target. As reported at the first late-breaking session, the choice and dose of statin are key factors influencing LDL-cholesterol lowering. In a meta-analysis of the VOYAGER (Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis of Statin Therapy in At-risk Groups: Effects of Rosuvastatin, Atorvastatin and Simvastatin) database of 37 studies of high-intensity statins, 71% of patients treated with rosuvastatin 40 mg achieved at least 50% reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels, compared with 59% for atorvastatin 8

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Hyperlipidaemia and monoclonal antibodies – paying for outcome

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:94–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.022

Hyperlipidaemia and monoclonal antibodies – paying for outcome

Gilbert Wagener

Abstract

Dr Gilbert Wagener (Transcrip Partners LLP) Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a new target for the treatment of hyperlipidaemia. PCSK9 is apparently complimentary to 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition with statins.6,7 Most advanced in the development path are two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PCSK9, alirocumab (SAR236533) and evolocumab (AMG145), both subcutaneous injectable drugs administered at bi-weekly or four-weekly intervals. Both compounds demonstrated solid reductions in LDL-C, however, dose selection for both focused on the most effective dose and did not consider titration ac

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March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:16

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

New drugs for diabetes A new DPP-4i for the management of type 2 diabetes, alogliptin (Vipidia®) has been launched by Takeda in the UK following data from EXAMINE, an outcome trial conducted in high risk acute coronary syndrome patients (see Br J Cardiol 2013;4:131) where the drug significantly reduced glucose levels and also demonstrated cardiovascular safety. Alogliptin and the fixed-dose combination product alogliptin and metformin (Vipdomet®) are now available in the UK. Alogliptin is licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults aged 18 years and older to improve glycaemic control in combination with other glucose-lo

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