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News from the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session 2013

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:54-5. Online First

News from the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session 2013

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

PREVAIL not presented but eases safety concerns on Watchman The PREVAIL trial of a new device which closes the left atrial appendage in the heart (Watchman®, Boston Scientific) attracted huge controversy at the ACC meeting when it was removed from the programme within an hour of its presentation because of an embargo break by the sponsor, Boston Scientific. But the slides and a press release were still made available to the media, and preliminary results appear to suggest some reassurance on safety concerns generated in a previous study. The device, which is implanted via a trans-septal catheter-based delivery system, is already available in

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Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 2):S2–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s06

Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

Professor Jose Lopez-Sendon, Dr Henry Purcell, Professor Paolo Camici, Dr Caroline Daly, Professor Jamil Mayet, Dr John Parissis, Professor Francesco Pelliccia, Professor Christophe Piot, Professor Rainer Hambrecht

Abstract

Introduction Stable angina is the most common manifestation of coronary heart disease. While considered relatively benign in terms of prognosis, the condition confers a higher risk of cardiovascular events than in the general population, with average annual mortality rates of 1–2%. Guidelines for the management of stable angina are relatively conservative in their approach, given their process of development. Moreover, stable angina management has not been as rigorously evaluated in large randomised trials as other coronary conditions. The role of newer treatment options in management algorithms also merits wider consideration. This expert

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The medical management of stable angina

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s03

The medical management of stable angina

Professor Kim Fox

Abstract

The new guideline from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)1 covers adults who have been diagnosed with stable angina due to atherosclerotic disease, following on from clinical guideline 95,2 which advises on diagnosis of chest pain of recent onset. A key priority for implementation in the latest guidance is to ensure that people with stable angina receive balanced information and have the opportunity to discuss the benefits, limitations and risks of their treatment. Initial management of stable angina should be to offer optimal drug treatment, addressing both the angina itself and secondary prevention of cardiovas

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August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:179

Ranolazine in the management of chronic stable angina

Khalid Khan, Matthew Jones 

Abstract

Introduction Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the major cause of death throughout European and other developed countries. While death rates have been consistently falling, rates in the UK remain relatively high compared to some Western European countries. The commonest clinical presentation of CHD is angina pectoris. Angina incidence rates generally increase with age and are highest in the 65−74 years age group in both men and women. The prevalence of angina is estimated to be 5% in men and 4% in women in the UK, giving a total of nearly 2.1 million (>1.2 million <75 years of age) with the condition.1 It is therefore a common dise

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July 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:159-60

Lasers vaporised from NICE guideline recommendations for refractory angina 

Christine Wright

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Recommendations Members of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society have recently issued a position statement on refractory angina (RFA).2 They have produced three recommendations: Collect accurate data on the incidence and prevalence of RFA in Canada To have a clear definition of RFA that reflects recent advancements in pain neuropathophysiology To have joint CCS and Canadian Pain Society (CPS) guidelines. The group are awaiting the results of a publicly funded study looking at the prevalence of angina six months after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). They are also hoping to establish a registry as part of a joint project with the CCS

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