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A survey of post-cardiac rhythm device implantation: movement and mobilisation advice in the UK

January 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:14–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.002 Online First

A survey of post-cardiac rhythm device implantation: movement and mobilisation advice in the UK

George Collins, Sarah Hamill, Catherine Laventure, Stuart Newell, Brian Gordon

Abstract

Introduction The number of patients receiving cardiac rhythm devices (CRDs) in the UK continues to grow.1 After device implantation, to reduce the probability of lead displacement and, therefore, re-intervention, patients are often advised to limit certain arm movements and physical activities for a defined period of time.2 Sources of this post-procedure movement and mobilisation advice include manufacturers’ guidelines, national information leaflets and local implanting centre policy. However, there is no consensus guidance on what the advice should be, and no published evidence to show that post-implant movement restrictions reduce compl

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Is training shaping up?

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:48–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.010 Online First

Is training shaping up?

John Ian Wilson, Jim Hall

Abstract

Multiple skills required Cardiologists need the ability to work as leaders of, or within, teams and systems involving other healthcare professionals in order to effectively provide optimal patient care. Cardiologists generally work as hospital-based specialists and need to integrate their work with, not only community-based primary care colleagues, but also other hospital-based physicians, as well as working closely with cardiothoracic surgeons and anaesthetists and the imaging specialties, e.g. radiology and nuclear medicine. Cardiologists may work some of their time as part of acute medical admissions teams looking after emergency medical a

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2012 BJCA trainee survey

February 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:8-9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.001 Online First

2012 BJCA trainee survey

Niall G Keenan

Abstract

Response rate and working hours Although typical of similar surveys, the response rate was disappointingly poor at 35% (261 of a total of 745 trainees enrolled with the Joint Royal Colleges Physicians Training Board [JRCPTB]). This limits, partially, the conclusions that can be drawn from the data as the sample may not be representative. However, given that important workforce planning decisions are made from these data, trainees should be strongly encouraged to take part, and it has even been suggested that the survey should be made compulsory through the Annual Review of Clinical Performance (ARCP) process. A majority (66%) of respondents s

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Aspirin taking in a south Wales county

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:238-240 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.006

Aspirin taking in a south Wales county

Peter Elwood, Gareth Morgan, James White, Frank Dunstan, Janet Pickering, Clive Mitchell, David Fone

Abstract

Introduction Daily low-dose aspirin (75–100 mg per day) substantially reduces the risk of subsequent vascular events, such as myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke.1 Evidence from primary prevention trials has indicated a reduction in the risk of a first vascular event,2 but the benefit–risk balance for this is open to debate.3 The prevalence of aspirin taking by patients at increased vascular risk and by the general population is unknown in the UK. The following reports a survey to determine the taking of regular aspirin within a representative community sample of adult individuals in the south Wales county of Caerphilly. Methods T

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Survey of cardiac rehabilitation across the English Cardiac Networks 2007–2009

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:33

Survey of cardiac rehabilitation across the English Cardiac Networks 2007–2009

Muhammad Shahid, Anita Varghese, Abdul Moqsith, James Travis, Andrew Leatherbarrow, Russell I Tipson, Mark Walsh, Linda Binder, E Jane Flint

Abstract

Twenty-eight English Cardiac Networks were surveyed annually from 2007 to 2009 using an email questionnaire to the network coordinators. There was a 100% response rate with the majority showing agreed work plan progress. Only 50% have a lead cardiologist for each programme. Although networks are committed to National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation (NACR), data submission remains non-uniform across 61% of networks. National Service Framework (NSF) standards were achieved by 41% in 2007, 47% in 2008 and 50% in 2009. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) post myocardial infarction (MI) guidelines including CR were met by

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September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:211–12

Cardiac rehabilitation: we should all be doing it

Anitha Varghese, Jane Flint

Abstract

A reminder The article by Pollard and Sutherland (pages 247–49) reminds us of the importance of such effective treatments as smoking cessation, regular exercise, a balanced diet enriched by fresh fruit but deficient in trans-fats, and a suitable body mass index.2 The author presents findings from a survey conducted on patients offered CR in the light of Department of Health guidelines outlined in the National Service Framework (NSF) for Coronary Heart Disease (2000), and raises several points.3 First, CR has once again been shown to achieve its intended goals. Additionally, it is an extremely popular intervention among patients, with nearly

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:117–8

Tomorrow’s cardiologists

Nicholas A Boon, Stuart M Cobbe, David Crossman

Abstract

New curriculum First of all, it is clear that there is strong support for the new curriculum. This was introduced in 2007 and comprises three years of core cardiology training followed by two years of modular sub-specialty training. The curriculum is competency based and supported by a wide range of both formative and summative work-place assessments and a knowledge-based assessment (multiple choice question exam). The Specialist Advisory Committee (SAC) has set up a subgroup with the remit of developing methods for selecting trainees into sub-specialty training and we are pleased to see that most trainees accept that this will have to be a c

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:119

Are you shocked by this report?

David Monkman

Abstract

Since April 2006 a total of 655 points are available in the clinical domain; 55% are directly for cardiovascular disease (including atrial fibrillation), hypertension and diabetes. The anticipated inclusion of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the recently revised QOF failed to materialise; this is of particular concern given the wealth of evidence supporting its inclusion. General practitioners (GPs) on average have achieved high QOF scores in the clinical domains related to cardiovascular disease and it therefore may appear surprising that the direct provision of diagnostic and monitoring equipment within general practice is very variabl

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July 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:297-300

How well informed are general practitioners about management strategies to improve the prognosis of heart failure?

Archana Rao, John Walsh, David Gray

Abstract

No content available

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July 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:302-5

Provision of rehabilitation services to patients with implanted cardioverter defibrillators: a survey of UK implantation centres

Dorothy J Frizelle, Robert JP Lewin, Gerry C Kaye

Abstract

No content available

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