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Tag Archives: survival

Congenital heart disease: an ageing problem

June 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:46–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.015

Congenital heart disease: an ageing problem

Gabrielle Norrish, Juan Pablo Kaski

Abstract

It is, therefore, with interest that we read the meta-analysis of long-term survival of individuals born with CHD by Best and Rankin.4 Utilising population-based studies, they report a pooled one-year, five-year and 10-year survival for all CHD of 87%, 85.4% and 81.4%, respectively. The survival estimates for individual CHD lesions differed, with ‘high-risk lesions’, such as tricuspid atresia or common arterial trunk, having a poorer survival than ‘simple lesions’, such as atrial septal defect (ASD) or ventricular septal defect (VSD), confirming what is seen in clinical practice. There were some surprising findings, including a worse

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Acute coronary syndrome in adults: scope of the problem in the UK

September 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24(suppl 1):S3–S9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.s01

Acute coronary syndrome in adults: scope of the problem in the UK

Chris P Gale

Abstract

Definition of ACS Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) include unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI is classified according to those patients with electrocardiographic ST-segment elevation, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and those without electrocardiographic ST-segment elevation, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI).1 The requirement for a diagnosis of AMI in the universal definition is the detection of troponin release from injured cardiac myocytes with at least one value >99th centile of the upper reference limit.1 Diagnosis is confirmed only if this is associated with at least one of: symptoms of

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Can marriage mend a broken heart (and save the National Health Service)?

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:130–1 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.036

Can marriage mend a broken heart (and save the National Health Service)?

Nicholas D Gollop

Abstract

The role of marital status and social support is becoming increasingly recognised as an important factor promoting recovery and rehabilitation following ACS.2 Marital benefits There are several large and robust studies that show that marriage infers a survival benefit following an ACS.3–6 The mechanisms behind these survival benefits are not fully understood, but are thought to be associated with living a healthier lifestyle, improved social support, assistance with medication, and rehabilitation compliance. There are opposing claims that an ‘unhappy marriage’ may infer cardiovascular health complications.7 However, in most cases, peop

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February 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:115-19

United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study: implications for metformin

Clifford J Bailey, Ian W Campbell

Abstract

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