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Tag Archives: type 2 diabetes

Updates from the American Diabetes Association 2019

September 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:88–9

Updates from the American Diabetes Association 2019

Amar Puttanna

Abstract

The American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions 2019 were held in San Francisco REWIND One of the highlights of the conference and, for many, the main event was the presentation of results from REWIND (Researching CV Events with a Weekly Incretin in Diabetes), a cardiovascular outcome trial (CVOT) for the GLP-1 receptor agonist (GLP-1RA) dulaglutide.1 Prior to this trial, the majority of CVOTs (and all prior CVOTs with GLP-1 RAs) were conducted in a predominantly secondary prevention population. Thus any positive cardiovascular (CV) outcomes were only shown in those with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The ba

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May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:52

In briefs

BJC Staff

Abstract

Stat tests loaded into the VITROS XT 7600 Moderate alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke Blood pressure and stroke risk increase steadily with increasing alcohol intake, and previous claims that one to two alcoholic drinks a day might protect against stroke are not borne out by new evidence from a genetic study involving 160,000 adults. Studies of East Asian genes, where two common genetic variants strongly affect what people choose to drink, show that alcohol itself directly increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a new study published in The Lancet (doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31772-0). Researc

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February 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:12

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Non-inferior cardiovascular outcome for DPP-4 inhibitor Results from the CAROLINA cardiovascular outcome study show that the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin (Trajenta®, Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly) is non-inferior to the sulphonylurea glimepiride in the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk. The study met its primary end point – defined as the non-inferiority of linagliptin versus glimepiride in time to first occurrence of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction or non-fatal stroke. The study, carried out over six years in 6,033 adults with type 2 diabetes and increased cardiovascular risk or est

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Prescribing for patients with type 2 diabetes and CV disease: should we be following the Scottish example?

December 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:127–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.030

Prescribing for patients with type 2 diabetes and CV disease: should we be following the Scottish example?

Sean L Zheng

Abstract

Dr Sean L Zheng CVOTs The key studies evaluated sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors – empagliflozin (EMPA-REG OUTCOME)4 and canagliflozin (CANVAS)5 – and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists – liraglutide (LEADER)6 and semaglutide (SUSTAIN-6)7 – in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or elevated cardiovascular risk (table 1). In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME (Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients–Removing Excess Glucose) study, the use of empagliflozin resulted in 38% and 35% reductions in cardiovascular death and heart failure hospitalisation, r

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November 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:133

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes cuts costs Self-monitoring of type 2 diabetes used in combination with an electronic feedback system results in considerable savings on health care costs and also travel costs for patients, especially in sparsely populated areas, a new study shows. The study, carried out in Northern Karelia by the University of Eastern Finland, found that by replacing half of the required follow-up visits for type 2 diabetes with self-measurements and electronic feedback, total costs of glycated haemoglobin monitoring were reduced by nearly 60%. The annual per-patient cost was down from 280 euros to 120 euros. Fewer follow-u

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The cardiovascular profile in diabetes

September 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 2):S4–S7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s07

The cardiovascular profile in diabetes

Naveed Sattar

Abstract

The changing cardiovascular risk imposed by type 2 diabetes Once upon a time, type 2 diabetes was considered a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent, meaning that the risk of a future CHD event was considered equal to patients with existing vascular disease. While this notion has been superseded, the risk for a range of vascular outcomes (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke or deaths due to other vascular diseases) appears approximately double in diabetes compared with the general population (figure 1).1 Less well appreciated is the observation that diabetes increases the risk of fatal events somewhat more than non-fatal, for reasons n

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Diabetes and cardiovascular risk in UK South Asians: an overview

September 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 2):S8–S13 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s08

Diabetes and cardiovascular risk in UK South Asians: an overview

Wasim Hanif, Radhika Susarla

Abstract

Introduction Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global epidemic with changing demographics that poses a huge challenge for the health and economy of all nations and ethnicities. Ethnicity is defined in terms of a culture of people in a given geographic region, including their language, heritage, religion and customs.1 South Asians constitute about 1.6 billion people from the countries of the Indian subcontinent, this includes Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka.2 Over 37 million ethnic South Asian diaspora live across every continent.3 Prevalence of diabetes in South Asians According to the International D

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Drugs for diabetes: the cardiovascular evidence base

September 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 2):S14–S18 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s09

Drugs for diabetes: the cardiovascular evidence base

Sam M Pearson, Ramzi A Ajjan

Abstract

Introduction Individuals with diabetes are at increased risk of vascular outcomes, and their prognosis following an event remains worse compared with those having normal glucose metabolism.1 The relationship between glycaemia and vascular disease is complex as it is affected by multiple glucose parameters, including chronic hyperglycaemia, hypoglycaemia and, potentially, glycaemic variability.2 To add to the complexity, the type of hypoglycaemic agent used may also alter predisposition to vascular events. Over a decade ago, one hypoglycaemic agent, rosiglitazone, was implicated in increasing the risk of vascular disease, which prompted the U

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August 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:97

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

A new gene therapy that targets the heart and requires only one treatment session, has been found safe for patients with coronary artery disease, according to a successful trial carried out in Finland (doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehx352). The treatment enhances circulation in ischaemic heart muscle and the effects were still visible one year after treatment. The randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled phase 1/2a trial was carried out in collaboration between the University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio University Hospital and Turku PET Centre. The biological bypass is based on gene transfer in which a natural human growth factor, AdVEGF-DΔNΔC, a ne

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June 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:61

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Nanoparticles, inhaled from sources such as vehicle exhausts, have been shown to cross from the lungs into the blood stream. They can then accumulate in areas susceptible to heart problems, according to research part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.  Previous studies have identified a correlation but not a causal link between nanoparticles and strokes or cardiovascular disease. It is not currently possible to measure environmental nanoparticles in the blood. So, researchers from the University of Edinburgh, and the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment in the Netherlands, used a variety of specialist techniques to t

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