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Tag Archives: acute coronary syndrome

October 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:143–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.028 Online First

New-onset giant T-wave inversion with prolonged QT interval: shared by multiple pathologies

Debjit Chatterjee, Priya Philip, Kay Teck Ling

Abstract

Introduction We published three cases with electrocardiogram (ECG) manifestation of new-onset giant T-wave inversion and QT prolongation associated with significant left main/left anterior descending artery disease in 2015.1 Since this publication we prospectively looked for patients in coronary care and the cardiology ward in our hospital who were admitted with, or developed during hospital stay, the above ECG changes. We found 10 patients with similar ECG features between March 2016 and February 2018. Four cases were associated with significant left main stem and/or left anterior descending coronary artery disease. Two cases were due to Tak

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January 2018 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.004 Online First

Recognition and management of aVR STEMI: a retrospective cohort study

Ruan Vlok, Joshua Wall, Hannah Kempton, Thomas Melhuish, Astin Lee, Leigh White

Abstract

Figure 1. ST-elevation in aVR Introduction The variety of electrocardiogram (ECG) changes that occur following acute myocardial infarction (AMI), occur in concordance with coronary circulation anatomy. ST-segment elevation in lead aVR can indicate an anterior wall AMI.1,2 However, lead aVR is commonly neglected by clinicians,3 and as such, this may be a potential source of adverse patient outcomes. The aim of this single-centre study is to investigate how proficiently AMIs presenting with aVR ST-elevation are recognised, using ‘door-to-balloon times’ as an outcome measure in patients having primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

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November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:129

REDUCE shows non-inferiority of short versus long DAPT in acute coronary syndrome

BJC Staff

Abstract

The COMBO™ dual therapy stent REDUCE (Short-term Dual Anti Platelet Therapy in Patients with ACS Treated with the COMBO Dual-therapy Stent), a physician-initiated, prospective, multi-centre, randomised study, was conducted in 36 hospitals in Europe and Asia, enrolling a total of 1,496 ACS patients. The study was designed to demonstrate non-inferiority of a strategy of short-term (three months) dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) compared to standard 12-month DAPT in patients with ACS treated with a dual-therapy stent. The stent used in the study COMBO™ (OrbusNeich) is a sirolimus-eluting stent with an abluminal biodegradable polymer matrix,

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Acute coronary syndrome in adults: scope of the problem in the UK

September 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24(suppl 1):S3–S9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.s01

Acute coronary syndrome in adults: scope of the problem in the UK

Chris P Gale

Abstract

Definition of ACS Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) include unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI is classified according to those patients with electrocardiographic ST-segment elevation, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and those without electrocardiographic ST-segment elevation, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI).1 The requirement for a diagnosis of AMI in the universal definition is the detection of troponin release from injured cardiac myocytes with at least one value >99th centile of the upper reference limit.1 Diagnosis is confirmed only if this is associated with at least one of: symptoms of

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When you can’t obtain a history…

April 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:78 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.017 Online First

When you can’t obtain a history…

Luciano Candilio, Juliana Duku, Alexander W Y Chen

Abstract

Figure 1. Patient chest X-ray showing a ‘full metal jacket’ Her physical examination and vital signs were unremarkable. Routine blood tests had been requested. Resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) showed left bundle branch block; no previous ECGs were available for comparison. A chest X-ray was performed, which gave another clue to the diagnosis… The chest radiograph (figure 1) shows clear lung fields, normal cardiac contour and, more importantly, a radio-opaque structure across the anterior surface of her heart. This is sometimes termed a ‘full metal jacket’, implying extensive stenting of a coronary artery in its entirety f

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June 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:79 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.022

Implementation of point-of-care troponin T testing in clinical practice

Faheem A Ahmad, Stephen Dobbin, Allister D Hargreaves

Abstract

Introduction Current evidence suggests there has been a marked proliferation of troponin testing within medical units as the troponin assay has become the cornerstone biomarker in the diagnosis of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).1,2 Both troponin T (TnT) and troponin I (TnI) are cardio-specific structural subunits and highly sensitive and specific markers of myocardial injury.3,4 Newer generation high-sensitivity troponin (hs-Tn) assays can detect increasingly lower troponin concentrations within an earlier time window of up to three hours.5 Early implementation of first-generation assays were accompanied with poor patient selection; ava

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Predicting long-term morbidity of ACS patients: can NT-proBNP succeed where other biomarkers have failed?

December 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:147–52 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.035

Predicting long-term morbidity of ACS patients: can NT-proBNP succeed where other biomarkers have failed?

Anna Kate Barton, Stephanie H Rich, Keith A A Fox

Abstract

Introduction For patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who survive to reach hospital, the majority of mortality and morbidity over the following five years occurs after discharge.1 Of all complications, development of acute heart failure (AHF) and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) are key determinants of adverse outcome. Approximately half of patients with ACS are readmitted to hospital, constituting a profound burden on healthcare resources.1 In several healthcare systems there are financial penalties when ACS patients are readmitted within 30 days.2 Prediction of the development of AHF and hospital readmission following ACS

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Acute coronary syndromes among South Asian subgroups in the UK: symptoms and epidemiology

October 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:153–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.033 Online First

Acute coronary syndromes among South Asian subgroups in the UK: symptoms and epidemiology

Simon W Dubrey, Sarah Ghonim, Molly Teoh

Abstract

Introduction Approximately 4.2 million people (7.5% of population), whose racial origins are from South Asia, live in the UK. High rates of coronary disease in Asians,1-4 seem likely to be influenced by genetic factors.5 We have previously reported differences in the presentation of coronary syndromes between British South Asians, as a whole, and white Europeans.6 The term ‘South Asian’ describes around 1.5 billion people (22.5% of the world’s population), occupying regions as diverse as Sri Lanka to Nepal. A wide variety of genotypes, cultures, diets, belief systems, educational attainment, socioeconomic status and risk factors are enc

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The French rivaroxaban experience: what we call progress is the exchange of one nuisance for another*

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 1):S1–S11

The French rivaroxaban experience: what we call progress is the exchange of one nuisance for another*

Thibault Leclerq, Samuel Goussot, Karim Stamboul, Yves Cottin, Luc Lorgis

Abstract

*citation from Havelock Ellis ‘Impressions and Comments’ Introduction Rivaroxaban is an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor belonging to the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) class. Concerning efficacy and tolerability, it has been reported to be more effective than enoxaparin in preventing venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery,1,2 and was non-inferior to enoxaparin followed by warfarin in a study involving patients with established venous thrombosis.3 Its good bioavailability, rapid-action and a half-life of 5–13 h,4 associated with a highly reproducible anticoagulant activity and the same rate of bleeding compl

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Novel oral anticoagulants in daily clinical practice – German experience with rivaroxaban

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 1):S1–S11

Novel oral anticoagulants in daily clinical practice – German experience with rivaroxaban

Ingo Ahrens, Christoph Bode

Abstract

Summary Oral anticoagulation has been restricted to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for more than 50 years. Starting in the last decade of the past century, central coagulation factors such as thrombin and factor Xa were explored as potential targets for the development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This led to the successful development and approval of a novel class of direct oral anticoagulants targeting factor Xa. Rivaroxaban was the first of the novel class of agents named ‘xabans’ that are direct oral factor Xa inhibitors. Since its initial approval for thromboembolic prophylaxis after hip and knee surgery in 2008, rivaroxaban a

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