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Tag Archives: acute coronary syndrome

News from the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session 2011

June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:105–8

News from the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session 2011

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

PARTNER: transcatheter valves just as good as surgery for high risk aortic stenosis Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is just as effective at reducing mortality as surgery for severe aortic stenosis in elderly patients whose age and overall health posed high risks for conventional surgery, according to the results of the PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve trial). However, stroke rates were higher in the trancatheter group. The transcatheter approach involves delivering a bioprosthetic valve to its target location with a catheter using either transfemoral access or trans-apical access (through the ribs) if peripheral

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Clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitor interaction: viewpoint and practical clinical approach

April 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:84−7

Clopidogrel and proton-pump inhibitor interaction: viewpoint and practical clinical approach

Mohaned Egred

Abstract

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Dose capping of enoxaparin results in sub-therapeutic anti-Xa level

April 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:82–3

Dose capping of enoxaparin results in sub-therapeutic anti-Xa level

Kristopher S Lyons, Vivienne Nesbitt, Ian B A Menown

Abstract

Introduction The low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) enoxaparin is recommended by the European Society of Cardiology as an antithrombotic agent for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) (class I level A indication in the treatment of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction [MI] along with thrombolytic therapy and class IIa level B recommendation in the treatment of ACS without ST elevation).1,2 A dosing strategy of 1 mg/kg twice daily is recommended as higher doses have been shown to result in increased bleeding without further clinical benefit.3 Weight-adjusted dose reduction is advised in patients >75 years and in those with

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In brief

February 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:15-6

In brief

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

NHA joins with BHS The Nurses Hypertension Association (NHA) has become part of the British Hypertension Society (BHS) after the BHS decided to invite nurses working in the field of hypertension and cardiovascular disease to be full members of the society. “This acknowledges the shift of care towards specialist nurses, particularly in primary care,” said Naomi Stetson, former head of the NHA. “In the current economic climate, it also made good business sense to have one united organisation.” All members of the NHA are now full BHS members and so the NHA has disbanded. “There is a strong Nurses Working Party within the society, which

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News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:211-14

News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

Abstract

Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. SHIFT: ivabradine shows benefit in heart failure

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:s3-s4

PCI in the UK – the continuing journey

BJCardio staff

Abstract

Introduction Developments along the way have included better patient selection, improved peri-procedural management of patients and, with newer-generation drugs and devices, better results. Recent hurdles have been confronted, including left main stem disease, complex bifurcation lesions and total chronic occlusions. Similarly, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has become the treatment of choice in acute myocardial infarction. Challenges remain, however, including restenosis. The fine balance between thrombosis and haemostasis demands that we provide more effective and predictable antiplatelet strategies to optimise risk reduct

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:s5-s8

Intervention: who to treat and how? 

BJCardio staff

Abstract

Introduction While primary PCI, rather than thrombolysis, is now the reperfusion treatment of choice for STEMI, the majority of patients coming for revascularisation in the UK have stable coronary disease or NSTE-ACS. In the treatment of NSTE-ACS, first principles involve the selection of patients for diagnostic angiography followed by either PCI or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Rates of PCI are increasing annually in the UK, which, in part, is a reflection of greater awareness of coronary artery disease, its earlier diagnosis and treatment in the ageing population. This section looks at coronary intervention in general, how PCI act

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September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:s9-s14

Optimising medical treatment of ACS

BJCardio staff

Abstract

Introduction The discovery of the thienopyridines, or ADP receptor antagonists, led to the development of more effective oral antiplatelet agents. Trials assessed dual antiplatelet therapy in high-risk patients versus aspirin alone and the significant benefits observed have resulted in dual antiplatelet therapy becoming a mainstay of treatment. As expected with more potent dual therapy, there is always a fine balance between prevention of thrombosis and bleeding risk. There are still many challenges to overcome. Many patients, such as those with diabetes or with a previous stent thrombosis, are at high risk for further infarction, indicating

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News from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009

February 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:13-18

News from the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009

BJCardio editorial staff

Abstract

ARBITER 6: niacin superior to ezetimibe for slowing atherosclerosis Use of extended-release niacin resulted in a significant benefit on atherosclerosis compared with ezetimibe in patients already taking statins in the ARBITER 6-HALTS trial. The trial, presented at the meeting by Dr Allen Taylor (Medstar Research Institute, Washington DC, US), compared two distinct lipid-modifying strategies in patients with known vascular disease already on statins who had LDL-cholesterol levels <100 mg/dL (2.56 mmol/L) and moderately low HDL-cholesterol levels (<50 mg/dL [1.28 mmol/L]). Among the 363 patients enrolled in the study, half were randomised

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November 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:265–7

The use of risk scores for stratification of acute coronary syndrome patients

Khalill Ramjane, Lei Han, Chang Jing

Abstract

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