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Tag Archives: acute coronary syndrome

Acute coronary syndromes among South Asian subgroups in the UK: symptoms and epidemiology

October 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:153–7 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.033 Online First

Acute coronary syndromes among South Asian subgroups in the UK: symptoms and epidemiology

Simon W Dubrey, Sarah Ghonim, Molly Teoh

Abstract

Introduction Approximately 4.2 million people (7.5% of population), whose racial origins are from South Asia, live in the UK. High rates of coronary disease in Asians,1-4 seem likely to be influenced by genetic factors.5 We have previously reported differences in the presentation of coronary syndromes between British South Asians, as a whole, and white Europeans.6 The term ‘South Asian’ describes around 1.5 billion people (22.5% of the world’s population), occupying regions as diverse as Sri Lanka to Nepal. A wide variety of genotypes, cultures, diets, belief systems, educational attainment, socioeconomic status and risk factors are enc

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The French rivaroxaban experience: what we call progress is the exchange of one nuisance for another*

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 1):S1–S11

The French rivaroxaban experience: what we call progress is the exchange of one nuisance for another*

Thibault Leclerq, Samuel Goussot, Karim Stamboul, Yves Cottin, Luc Lorgis

Abstract

*citation from Havelock Ellis ‘Impressions and Comments’ Introduction Rivaroxaban is an oral direct factor Xa inhibitor belonging to the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) class. Concerning efficacy and tolerability, it has been reported to be more effective than enoxaparin in preventing venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery,1,2 and was non-inferior to enoxaparin followed by warfarin in a study involving patients with established venous thrombosis.3 Its good bioavailability, rapid-action and a half-life of 5–13 h,4 associated with a highly reproducible anticoagulant activity and the same rate of bleeding compl

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Novel oral anticoagulants in daily clinical practice – German experience with rivaroxaban

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 1):S1–S11

Novel oral anticoagulants in daily clinical practice – German experience with rivaroxaban

Ingo Ahrens, Christoph Bode

Abstract

Summary Oral anticoagulation has been restricted to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for more than 50 years. Starting in the last decade of the past century, central coagulation factors such as thrombin and factor Xa were explored as potential targets for the development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This led to the successful development and approval of a novel class of direct oral anticoagulants targeting factor Xa. Rivaroxaban was the first of the novel class of agents named ‘xabans’ that are direct oral factor Xa inhibitors. Since its initial approval for thromboembolic prophylaxis after hip and knee surgery in 2008, rivaroxaban a

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September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:98

New NICE guidance published

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has said that thousands of people with atrial fibrillation (AF) could be prevented from having strokes, disability or death if its new guidance is followed. It says many patients with AF are not being appropriately anticoagulated and highlights how there has not been widespread uptake of novel oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs) which were approved by NICE in 2012. Clinical guideline 180 published in June 2014 updates and replaces the 2006 NICE clinical guideline 36. The full guidance can be found at http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/CG180 NICE Chair, Professor David Haslam writes on the

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Is Alice still in Wonderland of the ‘smoker’s paradox’? A meta-analysis of mortality following ACS

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:117 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.028

Is Alice still in Wonderland of the ‘smoker’s paradox’? A meta-analysis of mortality following ACS

Hisato Takagi, Takuya Umemoto; for the ALICE (All-Literature Investigation of Cardiovascular Evidence) Group

Abstract

Introduction Following observations that smokers experience decreased mortality following acute myocardial infarction (acute MI [AMI]) in comparison with non-smokers,1 the term ‘smoker’s paradox’ was introduced into scientific discourse more than 25 years ago.2 The ‘smoker’s paradox’ following various reperfusion strategies, however, is argued not to be due to any benefit from smoking itself but simply due to smokers being likely to undergo such procedures at a much younger age, and, hence, having, on average, lower comorbidity. In a recent systematic review (with a search by September 2010)2 of 17 studies presenting adjusted tota

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High-sensitivity troponin T is detectable in most patients with clinically stable heart failure

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:33–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.005

High-sensitivity troponin T is detectable in most patients with clinically stable heart failure

Kristopher S Lyons, Gareth McKeeman, Gary E McVeigh, Mark T Harbinson

Abstract

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High-sensitivity troponin: six lessons and a reading

September 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:109–12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.026

High-sensitivity troponin: six lessons and a reading

James H P Gamble, Edward Carlton, William Orr, Kim Greaves

Abstract

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July 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:88-9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.023 Online First

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in the UK – an end to status anxiety but no room for complacency

Charlotte Manisty, James C Moon

Abstract

That CMR is the gold standard for heart size and function, and for congenital and inherited heart disease is little disputed. The additional benefit of CMR for tissue characterisation has gained widespread acceptance, particularly now with convincing prognostic data across a wide variety of disorders,1 and the large EuroCMR registry (27,000 patients, 15 countries),2 showing that CMR entirely changed diagnosis in nearly 10% of subjects. CMR adoption as a ‘workhorse’ for ischaemia and viability testing has, however, been slower, with continued calls for cost-effectiveness and head-to-head comparison data with other modalities. These data ar

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Drugs for diabetes: part 9 prescribing for patients with cardiac disease

May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:85–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.017

Drugs for diabetes: part 9 prescribing for patients with cardiac disease

Anna White, Gerard A McKay, Miles Fisher

Abstract

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Current prescribing of statins and persistence to statins following ACS in the UK: a MINAP/GPRD study

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:24 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.003

Current prescribing of statins and persistence to statins following ACS in the UK: a MINAP/GPRD study

Rachael Boggon, Susan Eaton, Adam Timmis, Harry Hemingway, Zahava Gabriel, Iqbal Minhas, Tjeerd P van Staa

Abstract

Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in England and Wales (124,000 deaths in 2005) and for every fatality, there are at least two people who have a major non-fatal CVD event.1 Myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is a high risk of recurrence after the initial event. Recommendations on the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease for patients in primary and secondary care have been published in guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in England.1,2 In the May 2008 CG67 guideline, high-intensity dosage of statin

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