This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: atrial fibrillation

August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:87 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.028

Initiating oral anticoagulation in hospitalised AF patients: it’s time to talk

Matthew Fay

Abstract

Dr Matthew Fay (Westcliffe Medical Practice, Shipley) Honarbakhsh et al. highlight an important point in their paper: when should this be done and who should take responsibility. Their review of patients who have been admitted acutely with AF or atrial flutter, looking at the outcome of anticoagulation if risk factors are present, seems to provide lamentable data, with only 57% being referred for oral anticoagulation. Of course, there may be a question as to whether, with patient-led decision-making, the acute hospital ward is the right environment for a considered and final decision as regards this important question. We need to consider the

| Full text

August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:105–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.030

Oral anticoagulation in hospitalised patients with newly diagnosed AF: a story of too little, too late

Shohreh Honarbakhsh, Leigh-Ann Wakefield, Neha Sekhri, Kulasegaram Ranjadayalan, Roshan Weerackody, Mehul Dhinoja, R Andrew Archbold

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with a reported worldwide prevalence of 0.6% in men and 0.4% in women.1 AF is independently associated with a five-fold increased rate of stroke, which is comparable with the risk seen in patients with three or more other stroke risk factors.2,3 Furthermore, strokes related to AF are associated with higher rates of disability and mortality than other strokes.4-6 The cost of AF-related strokes in the UK is estimated to be around £750 million per year.7 AF-related stroke is thought to be secondary to thromboembolism from the left atrium to the cerebral circulation. Ora

| Full text
Calling the cardioverted: an audit of long-term anticoagulation in patients attending for DCCV

July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.025 Online First

Calling the cardioverted: an audit of long-term anticoagulation in patients attending for DCCV

Philippa Howlett, Michael Hickman, Edward Leatham

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the UK and is estimated to affect 2% of the general population, rising to affect 8% of individuals aged over 75 years.1 Without appropriate antithrombotic therapy, non-valvular AF confers a five-fold risk of stroke and thromboembolism.2 Oral anticoagulation effectively reduces stroke risk by two-thirds.3 Direct current (DC) cardioversion (DCCV) is one strategy to restore sinus rhythm in patients with AF (see figure 1), and has been used in clinical practice since the 1960s. This procedure has relatively high initial success rates, however, it has become increasingly evid

| Full text
The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: safety first or safety last?

June 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:50–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.018

The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: safety first or safety last?

Adrian J B Brady, Derek T Connelly, Andrew Docherty

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: a response

June 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:53–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.019

The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: a response

Campbell Cowan, Matthew Fay, Neal Maskrey

Abstract

We believe that the new guideline2 will be a major advance in stroke prevention in AF. We would suggest that Professor Brady and colleagues, in their focus on non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have overlooked the importance of a number of crucial aspects of the guideline. It represents a paradigm change in stroke management. The GDG were very keen to promote the concept that, whereas previously risk assessment was undertaken to define patients at high risk of stroke requiring anticoagulation, under the new guideline anticoagulation has become the norm for all but the lowest-risk patients. It represents a considerable simplification

| Full text
The effectiveness of a mobile ECG device in identifying AF: sensitivity, specificity and predictive value

April 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:70–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.013 Online First

The effectiveness of a mobile ECG device in identifying AF: sensitivity, specificity and predictive value

Jonathan Williams, Keith Pearce, Ivan Benett

Abstract

Introduction People with atrial fibrillation (AF) are five times more likely to have a stroke.1 AF is an increasing problem as our population gets older.2 It is, therefore, important to be able to identify this condition as early as possible, when intervention with anticoagulation can prevent stroke, as is recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), in most cases.3 Several studies have attempted to identify the most effective way of screening for, or case-finding, AF.4-7 The gold standard for diagnosis of AF is a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). However, the 12-lead ECG is an impractical diagnostic tool for a

| Full text
The efficacy of a smartphone ECG application for cardiac screening in an unselected island population

March 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:31–3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.009

The efficacy of a smartphone ECG application for cardiac screening in an unselected island population

Pierre Le Page, Hamish MacLachlan, Lisa Anderson, Lee-Ann Penn, Angela Moss, Andrew R J Mitchell; from the Jersey International Centre for Advanced Studies

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text

February 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:35 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.002 Online First

An arrhythmia specialist nurse improves patient care in arrhythmias treated with dronedarone

Moira Allison, Robert T Gerber, Steve S Furniss, Conn Sugihara, A Neil Sulke

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia, affecting 1–2% of the population.1 It is associated with an increased risk of stroke and death, heart failure, reduction in quality of life, mental health problems and cognitive impairment.2 Hospitalisation is common and costly.3 Dronedarone was first approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in April 20104 for atrial fibrillation rhythm control, but following two fatal cases of liver toxicity it is contraindicated in patients with liver dysfunction, a creatinine clearance (CrCl) ≤30 ml/min, in permanent atrial fibrillation or congestive heart f

| Full text
Risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes among patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation

December 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:158 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.036

Risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes among patients newly diagnosed with atrial fibrillation

Debra E Irwin, Michelle Johnson, Simon Hogan, Mark Davies, Chris Arden

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia characterised by uncoordinated activation of the atria. AF is a progressive disease and represents the most common serious disorder of cardiac rhythm. The incidence and prevalence of the disease increase progressively with age and is more common among men.1–5 AF is associated with higher mortality and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity.6–13 Specifically, AF is a recognised risk factor for stroke, with the proportion of strokes attributable to AF increasing exponentially with age.1,2,7,14–17 Although clinicians are most concerned about stroke risk among AF patients, c

| Full text
Unlocking the potential of NOACs

December 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 2):S1–S7

Unlocking the potential of NOACs

Mr Sotiris Antoniou, Dr Chris Arden, Dr Jan Beyer-Westendorf, Dr David Hargroves, Dr Terry McCormack, Professor Gordon McInnes, Dr Raj Patel, Oliver Segal

Abstract

When the NOACs (novel oral anticoagulants) were introduced over three years ago, they promised to revitalise the management of conditions such as atrial fibrillation (AF), venous thromboembolism (VTE) and thromboprophylaxis after major joint replacement surgery. Rivaroxaban is currently available in multiple indications, including (but not limited to): prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in adult patients with non-valvular AF, treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), and the prevention of recurrent DVT and PE in adults. For decades anticoagulant therapy in these conditions had relied on the vitamin K antagon

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now