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Tag Archives: coronary heart disease

October 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(4) doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.027 Online First

The PACI survey: Patient adherence to cardioprotective lifestyle interventions in myocardial infarction patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention

Justin L Mifsud

Abstract

Justin Mifsud Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of mortality worldwide, with 3.9 million deaths per year in Europe attributed to this disease.1 Optimal behavioural modifications of lifestyle risk factors in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) have been significantly associated with prevention of recurrent coronary atherosclerotic events.2 For this reason the joint task force of the European Society of Cardiology and other societies (JES5)3 have put emphasis on preventive cardiology lifestyle interventions, which are smoking cessation, making healthy food choices and contribution to moderate int

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News from ACC.14

April 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:56–7 Online First

News from ACC.14

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

HEAT-PPCI: heparin outperforms bivalirudin in primary PCI The major talking point of this year’s American College of Cardiology meeting was without doubt the aptly named HEAT-PPCI trial which generated more heat than has been seen at such conferences for quite some time. The trial acronym stands for How Effective Are Antithrombotic Therapies in Primary PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention), and the study – conducted in the UK under the leadership of Dr Rod Stables (Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital) – compared unfractionated heparin with bivalirudin (Angiomax®, the Medicines Company) in patients with ST-elevation myoca

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SHARPening up research in Scotland

April 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:57-8. Online First

SHARPening up research in Scotland

Abstract

Encouraging young researchers Death rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) are falling across the UK, but the rates remain high in Scotland with a slower rate of decline than the rest of the devolved nations.1 A recent Audit Scotland report has highlighted that although death rates of all types of heart disease have reduced by around 40% in the past 10 years, they remain the second highest cause of death after cancer.1 Between 1991 and 1996 the SHARP mobile screening unit successfully screened 19,400 Scots between the ages of 18 and 70 years, mainly at their place of work. Currently 14,694 people remain alive on this database, all of whom ar

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November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:167–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.029

Secondary prevention regimens and risk factors are not optimised in patients re-admitted with ACS

Krishnaraj S Rathod, Shoaib Siddiqui, Barron Sin, John Hogan, Sandy Gupta

Abstract

Introduction Over 90 people die from myocardial infarction (MI) every day in the UK.1 Cardiac rehabilitation, which incorporates cardioprotective drug therapies as one of its core components,2 has been shown to be associated with a reduction in recurrent MI.3 The National Service Framework (NSF) for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) set out a strategy in 2000 to change CHD services over the next 10 years.4 Improvements have been delivered in most standards of cardiac services but uptake and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programmes following MI, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery are still below the 85% target set f

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Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 2):S2–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s06

Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

Professor Jose Lopez-Sendon, Dr Henry Purcell, Professor Paolo Camici, Dr Caroline Daly, Professor Jamil Mayet, Dr John Parissis, Professor Francesco Pelliccia, Professor Christophe Piot, Professor Rainer Hambrecht

Abstract

Introduction Stable angina is the most common manifestation of coronary heart disease. While considered relatively benign in terms of prognosis, the condition confers a higher risk of cardiovascular events than in the general population, with average annual mortality rates of 1–2%. Guidelines for the management of stable angina are relatively conservative in their approach, given their process of development. Moreover, stable angina management has not been as rigorously evaluated in large randomised trials as other coronary conditions. The role of newer treatment options in management algorithms also merits wider consideration. This expert

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

Lancet highlights damage of physical inactivity

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

“It’s no coincidence that we’re publishing the series at a time when the country and much of the world is gripped with Olympic fever,” stated Dr Pamela Das, executive editor of the Lancet, at a press conference. One paper reported that 9.4% of deaths from any cause are attributable to physical inactivity. Although the host nation of the Olympics, the UK came out particularly badly in the research. In terms of coronary heart disease, lack of exercise was said to account for 5.8% of cases worldwide, but this rises to 10.5% in the UK. If everyone were to engage in just a modest level of physical activity, this would translate into a gain

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February 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:21

In brief

BJCardio editorial staff

Abstract

Coffee consumption shows CHD benefits in women A meta-analysis of a number of cohorts studies published in the International Journal of Cardiology (2009;137:216-25) demonstrates that habitual coffee consumption may be associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. Analysis of data from 21 cohort studies showed that moderate coffee consumption (of up to four cups of coffee per day) were associated with a 18% reduction in risk of CHD in women.  The investigators note that such an effect was unlikely to be caused by chance. Further benefits have been shown from a meta-analysis published in the Archives of Internal Medici

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May 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:141–4

Availability of cardiac equipment in general practice premises in a cardiac network: a survey

Alison Day, Carol Oldroyd, Sonia Godfrey, Tom Quinn

Abstract

Background Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of premature death in developed countries. The National Service Framework for Coronary Heart Disease (NSF CHD)1 sets out national standards for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of CHD including explicit recognition of the role of primary care teams. A further NSF chapter ‘Arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death’ was published in 2005,2 emphasising that patients with long-term conditions may be managed in primary care. It also highlighted better access to effective management of arrhythmias in all areas, including primary care. Cardiovascular diagnostic and monitoring equipm

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:79–81

Familial hypercholesterolaemia: recognising the unrecognised

Jonathan Morrell

Abstract

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:83-85

Low-density lipoprotein-apheresis: an update

Stefanos Archontakis, Alison Pottle, Mahmoud Barbir

Abstract

Indications, techniques and effects Low density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis is a selective lipid-lowering extracorporeal treatment where LDL and other atherogenic apoB-lipoproteins are removed from circulation while high-density lipoprotein (HDL) remains virtually unchanged. In the last years, individual authors as well as various scientific organisations have proposed different indications for using LDL-apheresis. The most widely used guidelines are those of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the USA,1 of the Federal Committee of Physicians and Health Insurance Funds in Germany2 and recently, those of the International Panel on the M

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