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News from the Cardiorenal Forum 12th Annual Scientific Meeting – Improving treatments in cardiorenal patients

March 2018

News from the Cardiorenal Forum 12th Annual Scientific Meeting – Improving treatments in cardiorenal patients

Fazlullah Wardak and Rosie Kalsi

Abstract

Do new diabetes drugs protect the heart and kidney? The day’s keynote session was given by Professor Johannes Mann (Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen, Germany). Diabetes management has been transformed with the introduction of newer agents with the promise of cardiovascular and renal protection. The sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are known to reduce the hyperfiltration, which occurs in early diabetic nephropathy. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are incretin mimetics, which have several benefits for diabetes management. The mechanisms by which GLP-1 agonist therapy may reduce blood pressur

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November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:136

Cholesterol – a problem solved?

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Genetic disease The benefits of child-parent screening for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), were explored by Professor David Wald (Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London). Detection rates are highest if FH is screened for in children between one to two years of age – a heel prick test, for example, is quick to carry out at routine immunisation appointments and uptake rates of 84% have been achieved. Screening is effective – a rate of four children and four parents are identified for every 1,000 children screened. The child benefits twice: their

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October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:138–142 Online First

News from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

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August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:88

London welcomes the 2015 ESC Congress

Dr Sarah Clarke

Abstract

The Congress offers a unique opportunity to showcase therapeutic and diagnostic advances, alongside cutting edge, bench- to-bedside science. There are five days of scientific sessions covering 150 cardiovascular topics with over 500 expert sessions. This year over 11,000 abstracts were submitted, and the theme is ‘Environment and the heart’. We at the BCS are holding dedicated sessions at the Congress, and on Saturday 29th August we are hosting a General Cardiology Day for General Practitioners and Allied Professionals, so do encourage your colleagues and primary care colleagues to join us. Extracurricular activities include a series of e

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Book review

July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) Online First

Book review

Gielen S, De Backer G, Piepoli M, Wood D

Abstract

Publisher: Oxford University Press, 2015 ISBN: 978-0-19-965665-3 Price: £115 (print), £29 (online, 1-year subscription) It is widely accepted knowledge among health professionals and the general public that premature cardiovascular disease can be prevented. However the evidence and guidelines on prevention are typically scattered, making integration into clinical practice problematic. The ESC textbook of preventive cardiology aims to collate all the aspects of prevention into one textbook. While the title may give the initial impression that the editors are going to be providing the old rhetoric on hypertension, smoking and lipid control,

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Hypoglycaemia: patient inconvenience or serious cardiovascular risk? 

December 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:128–30 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.031

Hypoglycaemia: patient inconvenience or serious cardiovascular risk? 

Vidya Srinivas, Kashif Kazmi, Ketan Dhatariya

Abstract

Symptoms with which patients present vary widely, and include autonomic symptoms, such as sweating, shaking, palpitations, and hunger, or neuroglycopenic symptoms due to cerebral glucose deprivation, such as drowsiness, confusion, odd behaviour and speech disturbances. One of the most commonly used measures of the severity of hypoglycaemia, the Edinburgh Hypoglycaemia Scale, is shown in table 2. Sometimes, patients do not have the classical autonomic or neuroglycopenic symptoms related to hypoglycaemia. To a diabetologist, this hypoglycaemic unawareness is worrying. This is because, while the patient loses their warning symptoms, neurocogniti

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June 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:51

Correspondence: aggressive risk factor modification: 30 year follow-up of IHD and non-haemorrhagic stroke

John Revill

Abstract

Aggressive risk factor modification: 30 year follow-up of IHD and non-haemorrhagic stroke Dear Sirs, In a single doctor’s practice in a high-risk area of South Sheffield, aggressive measures were taken to prevent ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and non-haemorrhagic stroke (ST) since 1980. Four cardinal risk factors were detected: smoking, diabetes, hypertension and cholesterol. Smoking, diabetes and hypertension were treated critically using standard guidelines and applying the latest evidence available independent of cost from 1980 onwards. Mortality from IHD has been known for many years to be directly related to the level of serum choleste

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March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:16

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

New drugs for diabetes A new DPP-4i for the management of type 2 diabetes, alogliptin (Vipidia®) has been launched by Takeda in the UK following data from EXAMINE, an outcome trial conducted in high risk acute coronary syndrome patients (see Br J Cardiol 2013;4:131) where the drug significantly reduced glucose levels and also demonstrated cardiovascular safety. Alogliptin and the fixed-dose combination product alogliptin and metformin (Vipdomet®) are now available in the UK. Alogliptin is licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults aged 18 years and older to improve glycaemic control in combination with other glucose-lo

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In brief

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:136-7

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Caffeine intake may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes Coffee and caffeine intake may significantly reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes, according to a new meta-analysis published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed and EMBASE. The fixed- or random-effect pooled measure was selected based on between-study heterogeneity. Dose–response relationship was assessed. Commenting on the implications of this study (doi: 10.1007/s00394-013-0603-x), London general practitioner Dr Sarah Jarvis said: “There is growing evidence to suggest that moderate coffee consumption, that’s four

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March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:37

Book reviews

Abstract

Rather than a structured textbook this is a collection of individual essays, some of which are very useful and interesting, and some not quite so good. There are 38 contributors for 18 chapters. Compiled for doctors ranging from the internist to the specialist, it is very much an American text. Outside of the US it will arouse the curiosity of those of us interested in hypertension, more in terms of an insight into the current thoughts of our American cousins. One particular insight is the recommendation to do urine spot tests for sodium and potassium levels, to check adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, with

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