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Tag Archives: epidemiology

May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:67–8 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.020

Incidence and epidemiology of infective endocarditis from 2010 to 2017 in a rural UK hospital

Laura A Hughes, Andrew Epstein, Neeraj Prasad

Abstract

Introduction Infective endocarditis (IE) is a relatively rare disease; however, it is becoming increasingly common and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.1 A recent meta-analysis has revealed that the epidemiology of IE has evolved over the last five decades,2 with significant global variation. Several large epidemiological studies show that the incidence of IE is increasing, particularly in male and elderly patients.3-5 There have also been changes in the microbiology of IE with staphylococci overtaking streptococci as the most frequent causative organism.6 There are few recent studies describing the incidence or epidemio

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Book review

July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) Online First

Book review

Gielen S, De Backer G, Piepoli M, Wood D

Abstract

Publisher: Oxford University Press, 2015 ISBN: 978-0-19-965665-3 Price: £115 (print), £29 (online, 1-year subscription) It is widely accepted knowledge among health professionals and the general public that premature cardiovascular disease can be prevented. However the evidence and guidelines on prevention are typically scattered, making integration into clinical practice problematic. The ESC textbook of preventive cardiology aims to collate all the aspects of prevention into one textbook. While the title may give the initial impression that the editors are going to be providing the old rhetoric on hypertension, smoking and lipid control,

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Aspirin taking in a south Wales county

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:238-240 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.006

Aspirin taking in a south Wales county

Peter Elwood, Gareth Morgan, James White, Frank Dunstan, Janet Pickering, Clive Mitchell, David Fone

Abstract

Introduction Daily low-dose aspirin (75–100 mg per day) substantially reduces the risk of subsequent vascular events, such as myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke.1 Evidence from primary prevention trials has indicated a reduction in the risk of a first vascular event,2 but the benefit–risk balance for this is open to debate.3 The prevalence of aspirin taking by patients at increased vascular risk and by the general population is unknown in the UK. The following reports a survey to determine the taking of regular aspirin within a representative community sample of adult individuals in the south Wales county of Caerphilly. Methods T

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Varicose veins, haemorrhoids and the risk of circulatory diseases: record-linkage study

June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:124–9

Varicose veins, haemorrhoids and the risk of circulatory diseases: record-linkage study

Faisal Rahman, Clare J Wotton, Michael J Goldacre

Abstract

Introduction Varicose veins (VV) are dilated, tortuous, superficial veins found typically in the lower limbs. Haemorrhoids are abnormal distensions of the arteriovenous plexus in enlarged vascular anal cushions, although they are often referred to as varicosities.1 It is unknown whether these two conditions, both classified as disorders of the venous circulatory system,2 are associated with altered risks of other circulatory disorders. If they are, this may suggest clues about shared aetiological mechanisms between VV, haemorrhoids and other circulatory diseases. It would also provide information of prognostic clinical relevance about patien

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January 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16(Suppl 1):S4-S6

What scientific progress have we made in PAH?

BJCardio editorial team

Abstract

Since then, there has been a steady exploration of the molecular mechanisms underlying PAH, which has led to development of effective targeted therapeutic options such as endothelin receptor antagonists and prostacyclin derivatives. In Professor Rubin’s view, these options represent a major success, but he hoped that there would be further progress. Many patients may not respond to these therapies, and it remains a serious and life-threatening disease. The characterisation of PAH into its clinical, pathobiological and epidemiological components has provided the opportunity to intervene therapeutically and to delay disease progression. Three

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May 2005 Br J Cardiol 2005;12:205-8

Heart failure after myocardial infarction: a neglected problem?

Martin R Cowie, Larry Lacey, Maggie Tabberer

Abstract

No content available

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March 2003 Br J Cardiol (Heart Brain) 2003;10:HB 8–HB 14

Vascular dementia

Lawrence J Whalley, Alison D Murray

Abstract

No content available

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