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Tag Archives: European Society of Cardiology

October 2017

ESC 2017: DETO2X – oxygen therapy does not improve survival in myocardial infarction

BJC staff

Abstract

The DETO2X-AMI study questioned the current practice of routine oxygen therapy for all patients with suspected myocardial infarction (MI), said Dr Robin Hofmann (Karolinska Institutet at Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden) who presented the study at the meeting. This prospective, randomised, open label trial enrolled 6,229 patients with suspected heart attack from 35 hospitals across Sweden. Half of the patients were assigned to oxygen given through an open face mask and the other half to room air without a mask. The study – using a registry-based randomised clinical trial protocol – was representative of real world practice and used nati

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October 2017

ESC 2017: PURE shows we should revisit dietary fat guidelines

BJC staff

Abstract

Results from the PURE (Prospective Urban-Rural Epidemiology) study, carried out on 135,000 individuals aged 35 to 70 years from 18 low, middle and high-income countries (North America, Europe, South America, the Middle East, South Asia, China, South East Asia and Africa) has contrasted with current dietary advice, by finding that high carbohydrate intake is linked to worse total mortality and non-cardiovascular mortality outcomes, while high fat intake is associated with lower risk. “Our findings do not support the current recommendation to limit total fat intake to less than 30% of energy and saturated fat intake to less than 10% of energ

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October 2016

Watch our ESC podcasts

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

For advances in atrial fibrillation, we talk to Professor John Camm (St George’s, University of London), who analyses new AF guidance and the registry ‘real world’ data emerging in this field. Dr Jubin Joseph (St Thomas’ Hospital, London, and President of the British Junior Cardiologists’ Association) speaks about the implications of some of the coronary artery disease studies, and also the use of telemonitoring in heart failure. Finally, Professor Patrick Moriarty (University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, USA) discusses what effect the new PCSK9 inhibitors are likely to have on life for patients with familial hypercholesto

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October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(4) Online First

Focus on pulmonary hypertension

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

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October 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:138–142 Online First

News from the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2015

BJCardio Staff

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Acute heart failure – a call to action

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 2):S1–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s02

Acute heart failure – a call to action

Professor Martin Cowie, Professor Derek Bell, Mrs Jane Butler, Professor Henry Dargie, Professor Alasdair Gray, Professor Theresa McDonagh, Dr Hugh McIntyre, Professor Iain Squire, Dr Jacqueline Taylor, Ms Helen Williams

Abstract

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Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 2):S2–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s06

Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

Professor Jose Lopez-Sendon, Dr Henry Purcell, Professor Paolo Camici, Dr Caroline Daly, Professor Jamil Mayet, Dr John Parissis, Professor Francesco Pelliccia, Professor Christophe Piot, Professor Rainer Hambrecht

Abstract

Introduction Stable angina is the most common manifestation of coronary heart disease. While considered relatively benign in terms of prognosis, the condition confers a higher risk of cardiovascular events than in the general population, with average annual mortality rates of 1–2%. Guidelines for the management of stable angina are relatively conservative in their approach, given their process of development. Moreover, stable angina management has not been as rigorously evaluated in large randomised trials as other coronary conditions. The role of newer treatment options in management algorithms also merits wider consideration. This expert

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

New ESC Guidelines on heart failure and CVD prevention

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

Heart failure The recommendations on devices, drugs and diagnosis in heart failure were developed by the ESC in collaboration with a heart failure association of the ESC. There have been several major updates since the previous guidance published in 2008.  The new updates include: In devices, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been hailed as a step change in the management of heart failure. LVADs are more reliable and lead to fewer complications than in 2008. Until now, LVADs have been used as a temporary measure in patients awaiting a heart transplant. Professor John McMurray (Glasgow, UK), chairperson of the ESC Clinical Practice

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May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:57

ESC issues position paper on new anticoagulants

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Of the three new drugs, the paper appears to particularly highlight apixaban saying it “is currently the best-documented alternative to both warfarin and aspirin for stroke prevention in a broad population with AF”. It adds that “apixaban has been shown to be superior compared with warfarin concerning the reduction of stroke and mortality in combination with a reduction in major bleeding, with a bleeding risk similar to that of low-dose aspirin, and with better tolerability than both these alternatives, albeit with no reduction in ischaemic stroke compared with warfarin”. The paper says dabigatran 150 mg is also a well-documented alte

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News from the ESC Congress 2011

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:208–210

News from the ESC Congress 2011

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

ARISTOTLE: apixaban superior to warfarin in AF patients Another oral anticoagulant has shown good results in comparison to warfarin for use in the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The new oral factor Xa inhibitor, apixaban, was superior to warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism and was also associated with less bleeding and lower mortality than warfarin in the ARISTOTLE trial. Apixaban is the third of the new generation of oral anticoagulants to be tested in this indication, and seems to have performed the best. The other two agents – dabigatran and rivaroxaban – have also been shown to be viable

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