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Tag Archives: ivabradine

January 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.006 Online First

Significant suppression of premature ventricular ectopics with ivabradine in dilated cardiomyopathy

Lal H Mughal, Andrew R Houghton, Jeffrey Khoo

Abstract

Case history A 79-year-old woman with a background history of non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy with severe left ventricular (LV) impairment, left-bundle branch block (LBBB) with QRS duration 130–140 ms and LV dyssynchrony, underwent cardiac resynchronisation device implantation after optimisation of her heart failure medication. She continued to remain breathless (New York Heart Association [NYHA] grade III) even after implantation of the device. Device interrogation revealed only 50% pacing due to interference by predominantly unifocal ventricular ectopics (VEs) with VE load of 20% on 24-hour Holter monitoring (figure 1), which did not

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In brief – cardiology news roundup

March 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20:16-17

In brief – cardiology news roundup

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

New editorial board member Dr Ketan Dhatariya We are delighted to welcome Dr Ketan Dhatariya to our editorial board. Dr Dhatariya is a consultant in diabetes, endocrinology and general medicine at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich. He is also a senior lecturer at the University of East Anglia, and an assistant professor of medicine at St George’s University, Grenada, in the West Indies. He has published on a wide variety of diabetes- and endocrine-related subjects, including diabetes-related foot disease. He serves as meetings secretary for the Association of British Clinical Diabetologists, and medical secretary for the Spec

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Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19(Suppl 2):S2–S11 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.s06

Chronic stable angina guidelines – is there an emerging international consensus?

Professor Jose Lopez-Sendon, Dr Henry Purcell, Professor Paolo Camici, Dr Caroline Daly, Professor Jamil Mayet, Dr John Parissis, Professor Francesco Pelliccia, Professor Christophe Piot, Professor Rainer Hambrecht

Abstract

Introduction Stable angina is the most common manifestation of coronary heart disease. While considered relatively benign in terms of prognosis, the condition confers a higher risk of cardiovascular events than in the general population, with average annual mortality rates of 1–2%. Guidelines for the management of stable angina are relatively conservative in their approach, given their process of development. Moreover, stable angina management has not been as rigorously evaluated in large randomised trials as other coronary conditions. The role of newer treatment options in management algorithms also merits wider consideration. This expert

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May 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:58

Ivabradine receives heart failure licence

News from the world of cardiology

Abstract

The licence follows the results of the SHIfT trial, involving more than 6,000 people, which demonstrated that patients with chronic systolic heart failure and a heart rate over 70 bpm had an 18% reduction (ARR = 4.2% p<0.0001) in the composite primary end point of cardiovascular death and hospitalisation due to heart failure. Ivabradine selectively lowers heart rate and the study showed benefits were greater in patients with higher heart rates (>75 bpm). Within the indication, Servier says ivabradine reduced the risk of death from heart failure by 39% (ARR 2.2% p=0.0006), the risk of death from all types of cardiovascular disease by 17%

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Optimised beta blocker therapy in heart failure: is there space for additional heart rate control?

March 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:21–3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2012.001

Optimised beta blocker therapy in heart failure: is there space for additional heart rate control?

Stuart James Russell, Maria Oliver, Linda Edmunds, Joanne Davies, Hayley Rose, Helen Llewellyn-Griffiths, Victor Sim, Adrian Raybould, Richard Anderson, Zaheer Raza Yousef

Abstract

Introduction Beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs (beta blockers) are an established prognostic therapy for chronic heart failure (HF).1-4 Of the many proposed mechanisms mediating these favourable effects, that of heart rate (HR) control is gaining interest. The Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with Iƒ Inhibitor Ivabradine Trial (SHIFT) reported that ivabradine significantly reduced a combined end point of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalisations in a relatively high-risk HF population with an elevated resting HR.5 HR control, therefore, appears to be both a modifiable risk factor and a disease modifying variable in patients with impaired l

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The medical management of stable angina

October 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18(Suppl 3):s1-s12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2011.s03

The medical management of stable angina

Professor Kim Fox

Abstract

The new guideline from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)1 covers adults who have been diagnosed with stable angina due to atherosclerotic disease, following on from clinical guideline 95,2 which advises on diagnosis of chest pain of recent onset. A key priority for implementation in the latest guidance is to ensure that people with stable angina receive balanced information and have the opportunity to discuss the benefits, limitations and risks of their treatment. Initial management of stable angina should be to offer optimal drug treatment, addressing both the angina itself and secondary prevention of cardiovas

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News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:211-14

News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

Abstract

Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. SHIFT: ivabradine shows benefit in heart failure

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March 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:63

In brief

BJ Cardio Staff

Abstract

New editorial board member We are delighted to welcome Steve Parry to our editorial board. Steve is a Senior Lecturer at Newcastle University’s Institute for Ageing and Health and Consultant Physician in Acute Medicine and Geriatrics at Newcastle’s Royal Victoria Infirmary. His clinical and research interests lie in syncope and falls, with particular expertise in the cardiovascular causes of the latter. He has published widely on these problems, is Chair of the British Geriatrics Society Cardiovascular Section, co-author of the European Society of Cardiology 2009 Syncope Guidelines and a member of the national Chapter 8 (CHD National Serv

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May 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:151–2

Ivabradine for inappropriate sinus tachycardia

David Wilson, Beresford Crook

Abstract

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March 2008 Br J Cardiol 2008;15:106-9

Effect of ivabradine, a novel anti-anginal agent, on heart rate and symptom control: a first experience in a clinical ‘real-world’ setting

Tanuj S Lad, Glenda Osuoha, Shamara Fonseka, Julia S Hadley, Sandeep Gupta

Abstract

Introduction An elevated heart rate may be a primary determinant of myocardial ischaemia by altering the balance of oxygen demand and coronary perfusion. Given that there is considerable evidence showing survival is inversely related to heart rate, lowering heart rate would be expected to be an important tool in the management of angina.1-3 Theoretically it may also be beneficial in the prevention of myocardial infarction as the haemodynamic stresses placed upon the myocardium by a high heart rate are associated with coronary plaque rupture.4 Approaches to lowering heart rate include the use of beta blockers and certain calcium channel blocke

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