This website is intended for UK healthcare professionals only Log in | Register

Tag Archives: lipids

‘Lipids in the community’ – HEART UK 29th annual conference

December 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:145

‘Lipids in the community’ – HEART UK 29th annual conference

Jaqui Walker

Abstract

Detecting undiagnosed familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) in the community and helping families manage the condition before it leads to a cardiovascular disease (CVD) event was one of the key themes of the conference. A second important theme was taking action on the risk factors and behaviours that are linked to CVD and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). These risk factors and behaviours have been understood for decades, yet the challenges of finding effective ways to help the population change to healthier behaviours, and how to assess and monitor this in clinical practice, remain. Professor Huon Gray, National ClinicalDirector for He

| Full text
NICE guidance updates on statins and secondary prevention

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:9

NICE guidance updates on statins and secondary prevention

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text
Statins: are they wonder drugs?

March 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:40 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.008

Statins: are they wonder drugs?

Veena Dhawan, Harsimran Sidhu

Abstract

Introduction Since their discovery in the 1970s, statins are widely used in clinics for the treatment of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Statins attenuate the intracellular levels of cholesterol by inhibiting the rate-limiting enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase, either by competing with the normal substrate in the enzyme’s active site, or by altering the conformation of the enzyme by binding to its active site. Lipid-mediated effects Statins exert their lipid-mediated action by decreasing the production of cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), by up-regulation of LDL-receptors and uptake

| Full text

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s05

Dyslipidaemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease: DYSIS results in the UK

Vian Amber, Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Susan Connolly, Timothy J Bowker, David A Wood, on behalf of the DYSIS Study Group UK 

Abstract

Background Statins are first choice for treatment of dyslipidaemia in both secondary and primary cardiovascular disease prevention. For every 1.0 mmol/L reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‑C), the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality decreases by 19% and overall mortality decreases by 12%.1 Despite statin treatment, a substantial number of cardiovascular events still occur, and one reason may be persistent lipid abnormalities including total cholesterol and LDL-C not at target, or low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or elevated triglycerides. Results from the DYSlipidaemia International Stu

| Full text
News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

September 2010 Br J Cardiol 2010;17:211-14

News from the 2010 Congress of the European Society of Cardiology

Abstract

Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. Highlights of this year’s European Society of Cardiology Congress, held in Stockholm, Sweden, from August 28th to September 1st included a new drug which benefits heart failure by slowing heart rate, and more exciting results from oral compounds that could replace warfarin in various indications. SHIFT: ivabradine shows benefit in heart failure

| Full text

November 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:295–8

Colesevelam – where does it fit into our clinical practice?

Devaki Nair

Abstract

Introduction Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) were the first class of lipid-lowering drug to be developed for reducing blood cholesterol levels.1 Now, after their introduction 30 years ago, BAS still continue to command a position in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia.2 How do BAS work? Figure 1. Mode of action of bile acid sequestrants BAS bind to negatively charged bile acids in the intestine and impede their absorption (figure 1). This process depletes the bile acid pool and disrupts the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, thus, increasing the synthesis of bile acids. Cholesterol is, therefore, diverted to bile acid synthesis, thereby reduc

| Full text

September 2009 Br J Cardiol 2009;16:242-5

10 Steps before you refer for: Lipids

Jonathan Morrell, Tony Wierzbicki

Abstract

(more…)

| Full text

November 2006 Br J Cardiol 2006;13:379-81

An unacceptable level of cardiovascular risk still remains prevalent in the UK – are we doing enough?

M John Chapman

Abstract

No content available

| Full text

March 2004 Br J Cardiol 2004;11:129-36

Evolution of the HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in cardiovascular medicine

Christopher J Packard

Abstract

No content available

| Full text

November 2002 Br J Cardiol 2002;9:570-1

HEART UK – a new charity to help tackle blood fats and vascular disease

John Reckless

Abstract

No content available

| Full text
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to print this page.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now
Close

You are not logged in

You need to be a member to download PDF's.
Find out more about our membership benefits

Register Now Already a member? Login now