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Tag Archives: NICE guidance

October 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(4) doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.028 Online First

Current diagnostic yield of invasive coronary angiography at a district general hospital

Ali Rauf, Sarah Denny, Floyd Pierres, Alice Jackson, Nikolaos Papamichail, Antonis Pavlidis, Khaled Alfakih

Abstract

Introduction Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) remains the cornerstone of diagnosis and treatment of patients with a high likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD), or those with significant or unstable chest pain symptoms. However, there is always a concern that we overutilise ICA and this exposes patients to a small risk.1 Furthermore, ICA is an expensive procedure and overuse of diagnostic ICA can compete with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and device implantations in hospitals with a single catheter lab. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2010 guidelines on stable chest pain, recommended that patien

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British Heart Valve Society update: a change in the NICE guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis

August 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:91–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.027

British Heart Valve Society update: a change in the NICE guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis

John B Chambers, Martin H Thornhill, Mark Dayer, David Shanson

Abstract

This change followed approaches to Sir Andrew Dillon by the widow of a patient with a replacement aortic valve who died from infective endocarditis (IE) developing after unprotected dental scaling. Her case included: evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis is effective in people at high risk of IE having high-risk dental procedures;3 the observation that the incidence of IE in the UK has accelerated above the global background rise since the original 2008 NICE guidance;4 a change in the law on consent.5-7  It is now necessary for dentists to appraise their patient of the differences between NICE and other guidelines, if it is likely that they

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July 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(3) Online First

Correspondence: influences on novel oral anticoagulant prescribing – findings of a NICE scholarship project

Matthew Rogers

Abstract

We read with interest Diana Gorog’s recent article on the uptake of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACS) in the UK.1 She drew attention to the slow uptake of these agents in the UK as opposed to many countries in Europe, and certainly the USA, and to the role that local medicines management committees (MMCs) may play in this. While the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance regarding all three NOACs available in the UK (apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban) is that they should be available as an option for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), many MMCs in the UK have sought to control p

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The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: safety first or safety last?

June 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:50–2 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.018

The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: safety first or safety last?

Adrian J B Brady, Derek T Connelly, Andrew Docherty

Abstract

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The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: a response

June 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:53–5 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.019

The new NICE AF guideline and NOACs: a response

Campbell Cowan, Matthew Fay, Neal Maskrey

Abstract

We believe that the new guideline2 will be a major advance in stroke prevention in AF. We would suggest that Professor Brady and colleagues, in their focus on non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), have overlooked the importance of a number of crucial aspects of the guideline. It represents a paradigm change in stroke management. The GDG were very keen to promote the concept that, whereas previously risk assessment was undertaken to define patients at high risk of stroke requiring anticoagulation, under the new guideline anticoagulation has become the norm for all but the lowest-risk patients. It represents a considerable simplification

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NICE guidelines for acute heart failure: long on pills, short on pumps

April 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(2) doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.014 Online First

NICE guidelines for acute heart failure: long on pills, short on pumps

Stephen Westaby

Abstract

Professor Stephen Westaby NICE’s medical therapy is excellent, until the end game, but drugs alone have limitations.5 Inotropes worsen ischaemia, while vasopressors elevate afterload. Injured myocardium needs rest to promote recovery, not a flogging.6 Consider two real patients. A 21-year-old female with ion-channelopathy is admitted to a tertiary care centre. After 75 DC shocks and cardiac massage she is in shock. She needs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) circulatory support but cannot be transferred.6 She dies. A 56-year-old male with ischaemic cardiomyopathy suffers acute on chronic heart failure. Renal impairment and pulmonar

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December 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:139–40

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Latest NICE guidance Acute heart failure New guidance on acute heart failure has been published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). The new clinical guideline (CG187) covers the diagnosis and management of acute heart failure in adults that are not addressed by the NICE guideline on chronic heart failure (CG108). It recommends all hospitals admitting people with suspected acute heart failure should provide a specialist heart failure team based on a cardiology ward and provides outreach services. It includes the following key clinical areas: the role of early natriuretic peptide testing and echocardiography the ro

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September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:98

New NICE guidance published

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has said that thousands of people with atrial fibrillation (AF) could be prevented from having strokes, disability or death if its new guidance is followed. It says many patients with AF are not being appropriately anticoagulated and highlights how there has not been widespread uptake of novel oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs) which were approved by NICE in 2012. Clinical guideline 180 published in June 2014 updates and replaces the 2006 NICE clinical guideline 36. The full guidance can be found at http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/CG180 NICE Chair, Professor David Haslam writes on the

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News from the British Cardiovascular Society 2014 Annual Conference

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:105

News from the British Cardiovascular Society 2014 Annual Conference

Dr Andrew Cox

Abstract

New NICE guidance Dr Andrew Cox (St George’s, University of London) Stroke prevention is the major focus of the new National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines on atrial fibrillation (AF), which were discussed by Dr Campbell Cowan (Chair, NICE Guidelines Development Group) in one ‘Hot topics’ session at the meeting. This presentation was in anticipation of the release of the final version of the guidelines a fortnight following the conference. This limited discussion covered the already published draft guidance, but points from this draft which were discussed have since been confirmed in the published guidance

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Talking about matters of the heart

July 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:89–90 doi:10.5837/bjc.2014.020

Talking about matters of the heart

David Haslam

Abstract

Yet, not all today’s physicians are keeping step with this new world. All too often adopting new ways of talking to patients or prescribing new technologies and medicines is left by the wayside in favour of keeping to tried and tested habits. Treating a common heart disorder Take the case with atrial fibrillation (AF), which affects around 800,000 people in the UK. Anticoagulation to reduce the risk of stroke is an essential part of AF management but according to the Department of Health many patients are not always appropriately anticoagulated.1 Since 2012, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has approved a number

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