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Tag Archives: RE-LY

April 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:(2) Online First

News from the UK Stroke Forum

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnoea and neurovascular disease The association between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and neurovascular disease was discussed by Dr David Hargroves (British Association of Stroke Physicians Education and Training Chair) and colleagues from East Kent during the training day at the conference. Dr Hargroves presented previously published data which shows that OSA is not uncommon: 24% of men and 9% of women in the general population may have OSA, 3−4% with clinically ‘obvious’ sequelae, and 60% of older and obese people may have OSA.1 Clinicians treating patients with neurological presentations should have a high index o

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Rivaroxaban in non-valvular AF – UK experience in perspective

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21(suppl 1):S1–S11

Rivaroxaban in non-valvular AF – UK experience in perspective

Diana A Gorog

Abstract

ESC guidelines and differences between NOACs Following the roll-out of the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published in 2012 a focused update of its guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation (AF). Since the NOACs tested in clinical trials all showed at least non-inferiority when compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), with a better safety profile, particularly with reduction in intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), the ESC 2012 guideline recommended NOACs as broadly preferable to VKAs in the vast majority of patients with non-valvular AF (NVAF).1 In 2013, the European Heart Rhythm Associati

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News from the British Cardiovascular Society 2014 Annual Conference

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:105

News from the British Cardiovascular Society 2014 Annual Conference

Dr Andrew Cox

Abstract

New NICE guidance Dr Andrew Cox (St George’s, University of London) Stroke prevention is the major focus of the new National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines on atrial fibrillation (AF), which were discussed by Dr Campbell Cowan (Chair, NICE Guidelines Development Group) in one ‘Hot topics’ session at the meeting. This presentation was in anticipation of the release of the final version of the guidelines a fortnight following the conference. This limited discussion covered the already published draft guidance, but points from this draft which were discussed have since been confirmed in the published guidance

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November 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:155

Highlights from HRC 2012

Drs Janet McComb, André Ng, Henry Purcell, and Andreas Wolff

Abstract

Stroke risk assessment in AF New insights on stroke risk assessment were provided by Dr Ami Banerjee (University of Birmingham), in a session supported by the Atrial Fibrillation Association. Table 1. CHADS2 score The CHADS2 risk stratification scoring system (table 1) is currently the indicator for the Quality and Outcomes (QoF) framework used to determine whether an atrial fibrillation (AF) patient warrants anticoagulation. It may underestimate risk and those with a score of zero may actually be at substantial stroke risk. He also pointed out that the system has inherent disadvantages. It does not include many of the risk factors for stroke

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August 2012 Br J Cardiol 2012;19:107–10

New data reassures on bleeding risk with dabigatran in surgery patients

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The study, published in Circulation on June 14 (Circulation 2012; 126:343–8.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.090464), reported bleeding rates in RE-LY from seven days before until 30 days following invasive procedures in a total of 4,591 patients. Procedures included pacemaker/defibrillator insertion, dental procedures, diagnostic procedures, cataract removal, colonoscopy, and joint replacement. Among patients assigned to dabigatran, the last dose of study drug was given an average of 49 hours prior to the procedure, compared with 114 hours in patients receiving warfarin. Bridging anticoagulation with heparin was given in 28%

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In brief

August 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:156–7

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

SAPIEN valve positive results Clinicians have achieved successful one-year outcomes in high-risk or inoperable patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement during the first two years since release of the valve (Sapien®, Edwards) commercially, according to results presented at the Euro PCR 2001 meeting in Paris, France. Despite high predicted mortality and multiple co-morbidities in many of these patients, survival at one year was 76% in the 1,038 patients treated as part of Cohort I (first year of commercialisation), and 77% in the 1,269 patients treated as part of Cohort II (second year of commercialisation).  Since November

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June 2011 Br J Cardiol 2011;18:111–12

In brief

Abstract

Controversial salt paper published A new European study has caused controversy by suggesting that lowering salt intake may not be beneficial. The study, published recently in JAMA (May 4th 2011 issue), was conducted by a team from the University of Leuven, Belgium. They followed 3,681 participants who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline for a median of 7.9 years, and found an inverse relationship between cardiovascular deaths and 24-hour sodium excretion (which correlates to salt intake), although systolic blood pressure was higher with higher salt intake. But an editorial in the Lancet (May 12th 2011 issue) criticises the study,

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