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Tag Archives: warfarin

Introduction

July 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(suppl 2):S3 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.s07

Introduction

Khalid Khan

Abstract

Effective anticoagulation improves outcomes in patients with AF or VTE.4-7 Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have provided an alternative to warfarin for prevention of stroke or recurrent VTE in these patients in recent years. Compared with warfarin, NOACs have more predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, do not require monitoring of the international normalised ratio (INR), and have a wider therapeutic window that enables prescription at fixed daily doses over an extended period.8 Edoxaban, an inhibitor of Factor Xa is a member of the NOAC class. The accompanying articles summarise latest findings on the effect

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Insights in patients with atrial fibrillation and co-existing cardiovascular disease

July 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(suppl 2):S4–S9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.s08

Insights in patients with atrial fibrillation and co-existing cardiovascular disease

Khalid Khan, Honey Thomas

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is encountered with increasing frequency in clinical practice,1 and is associated strongly with adverse clinical outcomes, including stroke, cardiovascular events and death.2,3 Concomitant atherosclerotic disease may increase the risk of adverse outcomes in people with AF. For example, peripheral arterial disease was present in 11% of a large cohort of European patients with AF, and increased the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular death, compared with patients with AF but no peripheral arterial disease.4 In addition, AF is associated with adverse outcomes in a range of other subgroups of patients, inclu

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The potential for NOACs in cardiac ablation in the UK

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S16–S17 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s04

The potential for NOACs in cardiac ablation in the UK

Adam J Graham, Richard J Schilling

Abstract

Introduction Figure 1. Open irrigated catheter, with pores for flow of heparinised saline seen on the tip Susceptibility to stroke is increased around the time of catheter ablation; with ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) being the most prevalent electrophysiological procedure and, thus, the most studied. Pre-ablation of AF, there is an increased risk of thrombus formation in the left atrial appendage; with potential for embolisation during restoration of normal sinus rhythm.1 During ablation, the risk of thromboembolism is accounted for by endothelial injury, hypercoagulability due to contact of blood with foreign surfaces and altered blo

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Use of NOAC drugs in DC cardioversion for patients with non-valvular AF

August 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25(suppl 1):S18–S20 doi:10.5837/bjc.2018.s05

Use of NOAC drugs in DC cardioversion for patients with non-valvular AF

Craig S Barr

Abstract

Introduction Direct current cardioversion (DCCV) is a frequently used and effective strategy for the restoration of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that is persistent and of recent onset. It has been undertaken for almost 60 years.1 While thromboembolic events are associated with this procedure, prior anticoagulation reduces this risk to less than 1%.2 Anticoagulation is given to patients for at least three weeks prior to the procedure and maintained long term, unless they are at low future risk of stroke and systemic embolism (which is very few patients presenting for cardioversion), namely men with a CHA2DS2-VASc sco

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June 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:52

General news

BJC Staff

Abstract

New practical NOACs guide A new version of EHRA Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) was launched at the congress. ESC guidelines state that NOACs should be preferred over vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, for stroke prevention in AF patients, except those with a mechanical heart valve or rheumatic mitral valve stenosis, and their use in clinical practice is increasing. The guide gives concrete, practical advice on how to use NOACs in specific clinical situations. The guide is published in European Heart Journal (doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy136). Anti

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October 2017

ESC 2017: RE-DUAL PCI shows benefits for dabigatran

BJC staff

Abstract

Approximately 20–30% of patients with AF, who are continuously taking an oral anticoagulant to reduce their risk of AF-related stroke, have coexisting coronary artery disease and may require PCI. The current practice of administering triple therapy with warfarin and two antiplatelet agents in patients with AF after a PCI is associated with high rates of major bleeding. RE-DUAL PCI tested an alternative treatment strategy: dual therapy with dabigatran and a single antiplatelet agent (P2Y12 inhibitor). Selected for one of the meeting’s hotline sessions and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine (https://doi.org/10.

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Introduction

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 2):S1–S12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s02

Introduction

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Drug therapies include anticoagulants to reduce the risk of stroke and anti-arrhythmics to restore/maintain the normal heart rhythm or slow the heart rate in patients who remain in AF. Non-pharmacological management options include electrical cardioversion, which may be used to ‘shock’ the heart back to its normal rhythm. The high risk of stroke associated with electrical cardioversion can be reduced by oral anticoagulation. Although effective in reducing the risk of thromboembolism, the limitations of warfarin present considerable challenges for its use in clinical practice. The challenges of maintaining warfarin within an appropriate th

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Direct current cardioversion and thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation

November 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23(suppl 2):S1–S12 doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.s02

Direct current cardioversion and thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms of AF lies at the heart of its treatment. AF occurs when structural and/or electrophysiological abnormalities alter atrial tissue to promote abnormal impulse formation and/or propagation (figure 1).3 Multiple clinical risk factors, electrocardiographic/echocardiographic features and biochemical markers are associated with an increased risk of AF (table 1), and, AF can be described in terms of the duration of episodes using a simplified scheme (table 2).3 Figure 1. Mechanisms of atrial fibrillation Table 1. Risk factors3 The aim of treatment is to prevent stroke and alleviate symptoms.4 Drug therapies include antic

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In brief

June 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:53–4

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published recommendations supporting the use of two new lipid-lowering agents – both PCSK9 inhibitors, which inhibit the body’s natural system for eliminating low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). A Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) has been published for evolocumab (Repatha®, Amgen) recommending it be used alone or in combination with other cholesterol-lowering therapies, for several types of patients at particularly high risk of cardiovascular events with persistently high cholesterol despite maximal tolerated lipid-lowering therapy.  The NICE recommendation is

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February 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(1) doi:10.5837/bjc.2016.006 Online First

Comparison of warfarin dosage needed to achieve target INR before and after cardiac surgery

Cindy San, Doson Chua, Hilary Wu, Jian Ye

Abstract

Introduction Warfarin is an anticoagulant commonly used in atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, prosthetic cardiac valve replacement and postoperative atrial fibrillation.1 Warfarin is usually discontinued prior to cardiac surgery and subsequently re-initiated postoperatively to achieve the target therapeutic international normalised ratio (INR).2 At the cardiac surgery unit of St. Paul’s Hospital, it has been observed that the warfarin dosage needed to achieve therapeutic anticoagulation is often lower post-cardiac surgery, compared with the patient’s warfarin dose prior to cardiac surgery. Serious complications, such as postoper

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