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Tag Archives: cardiac rehabilitation

June 2020 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.019

COVID-19 and cardiac rehabilitation

Professor Susan Dawkes (Edinburgh Napier University / British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation [BACPR]), Sally Hughes (British Heart Foundation), Professor Simon Ray (British Cardiovascular Society), Dr Simon Nichols (Sheffield Hallam University / BACPR), Sally Hinton (BACPR), Ceri Roberts (North Bristol NHS Trust / BACPR), Dr Tom Butler (University of Chester / BACPR), Dr Hayes Delal (Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust / BACPR), Professor Patrick Docherty (University of York / National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation)
With thanks to: Richard Forsyth (British Heart Foundation), Professor Rod Taylor (University of Glasgow), Professor Lis Neubeck (Edinburgh Napier University), Dr Scott Murray (Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust/ BACPR), Gill Farthing (Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust / BACPR), Simone Meldrum (West Suffolk Community Cardiac Rehabilitation / BACPR), Tracy Kitto (East London NHS Foundation Trust / BACPR), Ruby Miller (Cwm Taf Morgannwg University Health Board / BACPR), Alison Allen (Prince Charles Hospital / BACPR)

Abstract

“The COVID-19 pandemic is arguably one of the greatest public health challenges of our time, however, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the most common global cause of morbidity and mortality with over 18 million deaths per year. Understandably, hospitals have postponed non-critical services so that healthcare professionals can be deployed to areas dealing with patients who have the COVID-19 virus. However, there remains an ongoing need to assess, support and rehabilitate those who have CVD or are newly diagnosed with it to prevent the significant risk of unintended, yet significant consequences in the long-term. The consequence of withd

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June 2020 Br J Cardiol 2020;27:67–70 doi:10.5837/bjc.2020.020

An exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation programme for AF patients in the NHS: a feasibility study

Mark Mills, Elizabeth Johnson, Hamza Zafar, Andrew Horwood, Nicola Lax, Sarah Charlesworth, Anna Gregory, Justin Lee, Jonathan Sahu, Graeme Kirkwood, Nicholas Kelland, Andreas Kyriacou

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac rhythm disturbance in adults, estimated to affect 3.29% of the population in the UK in 2016.1 The condition is strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in addition to reduced quality of life.2 The healthcare costs of managing patients with AF are high: estimates of the direct cost in Western Europe range from €450 to €3,000 per patient-year.3 Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is an established intervention in the management of several cardiovascular conditions, including coronary artery disease4 and heart failure.5 There is increasing re

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A region-wide audit of cardiac rehabilitation services

December 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:158 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.043

A region-wide audit of cardiac rehabilitation services

M Justin S Zaman on behalf of all ACRAN healthcare professionals

Abstract

Introduction ACRAN healthcare team Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) services are comprehensive, long-term programmes involving medical evaluation, prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, education and counselling. CR has been extensively reviewed in the literature,1 and, in patients after myocardial infarction, has been shown to reduce all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates in a Cochrane review.2 However, it has also been shown by others to have little effect on outcomes.3 Doubts over the efficacy of CR have led commissioners to question the value of such services. While the debate continues, the Anglia region CR services (reb

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19

Introduction: Cardiovascular health and disease prevention in clinical practice

Kornelia Kotseva, Mary Seed, David Wood

Abstract

Promoting cardiovascular health is central to the national strategy to reduce premature mortality in our population. In this supplement, we offer a new approach to cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention through the MyAction preventive cardiology programme, developed by Imperial College London. This nurse-led, multi-disciplinary, family-centred service embraces all patients with atherosclerotic disease – coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral arterial disease – together with those identified through Health Checks to be at high risk of developing CVD in one community-based programme. In this supplement, we describe the studies that

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s03

MyAction and the new cardiovascular outcomes strategy

David A Wood Full author details can be found here.

Abstract

Introduction Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a single family of diseases with common antecedents requiring a holistic approach to prevention. This is the central theme of the new cardiovascular outcomes strategy for NHS England.1 Atherosclerosis is ubiquitous in the population, manifesting itself in different ways – acute coronary syndromes, transient cerebral ischaemia or claudication – but linked by a common pathology and underlying causes in terms of lifestyle and related risk factors. Many with one expression of this disease commonly suffer from another, and yet each is managed in silos of care through cardiology, stroke and vascul

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What is cardiac rehabilitation achieving for patients with CHD? The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT results

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s04

What is cardiac rehabilitation achieving for patients with CHD? The ASPIRE-2-PREVENT results

Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, David A Wood, on behalf of ASPIRE-2-PREVENT Study Group

Abstract

The main objective of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation in clinical practice is to reduce the risk of future vascular events, to improve quality of life and increase life expectancy. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is recommended by the British Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation (BACPR).1 This second edition of the Standards and Core Components (SCC) for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Rehabilitation from the BACPR, define CR through seven standards and seven core components for assuring a quality service of care using a multi-disciplinary biological and psychosocial approach.2 However, the implementatio

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s05

Dyslipidaemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease: DYSIS results in the UK

Vian Amber, Kornelia Kotseva, Elizabeth L Turner, Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Susan Connolly, Timothy J Bowker, David A Wood, on behalf of the DYSIS Study Group UK 

Abstract

Background Statins are first choice for treatment of dyslipidaemia in both secondary and primary cardiovascular disease prevention. For every 1.0 mmol/L reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‑C), the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality decreases by 19% and overall mortality decreases by 12%.1 Despite statin treatment, a substantial number of cardiovascular events still occur, and one reason may be persistent lipid abnormalities including total cholesterol and LDL-C not at target, or low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or elevated triglycerides. Results from the DYSlipidaemia International Stu

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December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s06

The principles of MyAction

Catriona Jennings, Alison Atrey, Jennifer Jones, Kornelia Kotseva, David A Wood, on behalf of the MyAction Central team

Abstract

The programme is implemented according to national evidence-based guidelines and local policies. The programme integrates primary and secondary prevention in one programme and recruits all those who will benefit the most, i.e. patients with vascular disease, those at high risk of developing disease, and the close family members of the above, and takes into account the groups in which the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors is the highest. The programme is family centred and so recruits the spouse and/or others close to the patient in order to maximise the potential for adoption of positive healthy behaviours. Wherever possib

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Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: NHS Westminster, London

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s07

Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: NHS Westminster, London

Susan Connolly, Adrian Brown, Sarah-Jane Clements, Christine Yates, Kornelia Kotseva, on behalf of Westminster MyAction teams

Abstract

MyAction Westminster: background In response to the Department of Health (DoH) policy document Putting Prevention First,1 NHS Westminster launched its Health Checks programme in primary care in 2009. The MyAction Westminster programme was concomitantly commissioned by NHS Westminster so that those individuals identified to be at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk through the Health Checks could access, with their families, an effective vascular prevention programme that would help them achieve measurably healthier lives. Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust were successful in becoming the providers of the programme with an annual budget

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Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: Galway, Republic of Ireland

December 2013 Br J Cardiol 2013;20(suppl 3):S1–S19 doi:10.5837/bjc.2013.s08

Delivering the MyAction programme in different populations: Galway, Republic of Ireland

Irene Gibson, James Crowley, Jennifer Jones, Claire Kerins, Anne Marie Walsh, Caroline Costello, Jane Windle, Gerard Flaherty, on behalf of Croí MyAction team

Abstract

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the single most common cause of death in Ireland, with diseases of the circulatory system accounting for 33.5% of deaths.1 While there has been a significant decline in death rates over the last 30 years, CVD mortality rates in Ireland remain high in comparison with European averages.2 There is compelling evidence that managing risk factors through lifestyle intervention and cardioprotective drug management can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality by up to 90%.3 In Ireland, high-risk approaches to prevention have traditionally targeted those with established heart disease, yet there are many

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