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Tag Archives: stroke

Insights in stroke prevention in patients with a prior history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack

July 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26(suppl 2):S10–S14 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.s09

Insights in stroke prevention in patients with a prior history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack

Paul Guyler

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) more than doubles the five-year risk of stroke in middle-aged men and women.1 Prior cerebrovascular disease markedly amplifies the risk of recurrent stroke in patients with or without AF.1,2 Figure 1 shows the influence of AF and prior cerebrovascular disease (stroke or transient ischaemic attack [TIA]) on the estimated five-year risk of a composite of stroke, systemic thromboembolism, or TIA (most events were ischaemic strokes) for a 60-year-old individual, from a large cohort study conducted in the UK.1 These observations demonstrate the need for long-term treatment to reduce the risk of stroke in thes

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May 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:52

In briefs

BJC Staff

Abstract

Stat tests loaded into the VITROS XT 7600 Moderate alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke Blood pressure and stroke risk increase steadily with increasing alcohol intake, and previous claims that one to two alcoholic drinks a day might protect against stroke are not borne out by new evidence from a genetic study involving 160,000 adults. Studies of East Asian genes, where two common genetic variants strongly affect what people choose to drink, show that alcohol itself directly increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a new study published in The Lancet (doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31772-0). Researc

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Non-prescription of anticoagulants in patients discharged with stroke and atrial fibrillation

February 2019 Br J Cardiol 2019;26:23–6 doi:10.5837/bjc.2019.007

Non-prescription of anticoagulants in patients discharged with stroke and atrial fibrillation

Calum Creaney, Karissa Barkat, Christopher Durey, Susan Gallagher, Linda Campbell, Ashish MacAden, Paul Findlay, Gordon F Rushworth, Stephen J Leslie

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases an individual’s risk of stroke fivefold.1 Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with warfarin reduces the risk of stroke by 64%.2 Novel or direct oral anticoagulants are non-inferior to warfarin in preventing stroke in non-valvular AF and have a similar bleeding profile, but with a lower risk of fatal intracranial haemorrhage and several practical advantages.3-7 While several antiplatelet agents have been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke, they are considerably less effective than OAC, with a similar risk of major bleeding, and, therefore, are no longer recommended in national guidelines for

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June 2018 Br J Cardiol 2018;25:52

General news

BJC Staff

Abstract

New practical NOACs guide A new version of EHRA Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) was launched at the congress. ESC guidelines state that NOACs should be preferred over vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, for stroke prevention in AF patients, except those with a mechanical heart valve or rheumatic mitral valve stenosis, and their use in clinical practice is increasing. The guide gives concrete, practical advice on how to use NOACs in specific clinical situations. The guide is published in European Heart Journal (doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehy136). Anti

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March 2018

In brief

BJC Staff

Abstract

Large-scale studies examining these key aspects of work have been carried out in the US, but not within the UK and there is a significant data gap. The survey will take only 15–20 minutes to complete and will provide valuable insight in to the professional life of the UK cardiologist. Visit: https://bbk.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/the-organisation-life-work-balance-and-gender-perceptions CASTLE-AF: AF ablation first-line therapy in HF? Results from CASTLE-AF “indicate heart failure patients with co-existing AF should be treated with catheter ablation as a first-line therapy,” says the study’s co-lead investigator Dr Johannes Brachmann, (Cobur

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November 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:135

Cardiff Met launches stroke research hub

BJC Staff

Abstract

Cardiff Metropolitan University has just launched Stroke Hub Wales (SHW) – a resource facility that will support and coordinate research, innovation and education programmes across Wales – part of the Welsh Government’s five-year strategy to tackle stroke in individuals of all ages. The aim of SHW (www.stroke.wales) is to achieve a step-change in high-impact stroke research for the benefit of the health, wellbeing and prosperity of people in Wales. The hub will act as a resource for researchers, clinicians and allied health professionals across our NHS Trusts, University Health Boards and Universities. It will build on established relat

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October 2017 Br J Cardiol 2017;24:(4) doi:10.5837/bjc.2017.026 Online First

How hard do we look for atrial fibrillation?

Ioannis Merinopoulos, Sajid Alam, David Bloore

Abstract

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October 2016 Br J Cardiol 2016;23:(4) Online First

Anticoagulation highlights from the ESC

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

New AF guidelines The first collaborative European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation (AF) were published at the start of the congress.1 These multidisciplinary guidelines focus on early detection of asymptomatic AF, recommending both opportunistic and targeted screening for all patients aged ≥65 years, or with stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). In addition, the guidelines deal with long-term challenges in the management of AF patients, with recommendations on what to do when patients develop complications on anticoagulation, re-initiation of an

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August 2015 Br J Cardiol 2015;22:105–9 doi:10.5837/bjc.2015.030

Oral anticoagulation in hospitalised patients with newly diagnosed AF: a story of too little, too late

Shohreh Honarbakhsh, Leigh-Ann Wakefield, Neha Sekhri, Kulasegaram Ranjadayalan, Roshan Weerackody, Mehul Dhinoja, R Andrew Archbold

Abstract

Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with a reported worldwide prevalence of 0.6% in men and 0.4% in women.1 AF is independently associated with a five-fold increased rate of stroke, which is comparable with the risk seen in patients with three or more other stroke risk factors.2,3 Furthermore, strokes related to AF are associated with higher rates of disability and mortality than other strokes.4-6 The cost of AF-related strokes in the UK is estimated to be around £750 million per year.7 AF-related stroke is thought to be secondary to thromboembolism from the left atrium to the cerebral circulation. Ora

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In brief

September 2014 Br J Cardiol 2014;21:99

In brief

BJCardio Staff

Abstract

BSH Parliament day Professor Andrew Clark (President of the British Society for Heart Failure) is pictured here (centre) carrying out an echocardiogram in the House of Commons. He was at a BSH event to help raise awareness that a person diagnosed with heart failure is likely to have a worse prognosis than if they were diagnosed with most cancers. This is despite the availability of specialist heart failure services that can have a remarkable impact on a patient’s chance of survival, but for which there is inconsistent access over the UK leading to wide variations in care and outcomes. Over 60 MPs, Peers, and professional and patient groups

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